Contents in 1999-06-04-13 of release-21-2.
[chise/xemacs-chise.git.1] / man / xemacs-faq.texi
1 \input texinfo.tex      @c -*-texinfo-*-
2 @c %**start of header
3 @setfilename ../info/xemacs-faq.info
4 @settitle Frequently asked questions about XEmacs
5 @setchapternewpage off
6 @c %**end of header
7 @finalout
8 @titlepage
9 @title XEmacs FAQ
10 @subtitle Frequently asked questions about XEmacs @* Last Modified: $Date: 1999/05/13 12:26:40 $
11 @sp 1
12 @author Tony Rossini <arossini@@stat.sc.edu>
13 @author Ben Wing <wing@@666.com>
14 @author Chuck Thompson <cthomp@@xemacs.org>
15 @author Steve Baur <steve@@xemacs.org>
16 @author Andreas Kaempf <andreas@@sccon.com>
17 @author Christian Nyb@o{} <chr@@mediascience.no>
18 @page
19 @end titlepage
20
21 @ifinfo
22 @dircategory XEmacs Editor
23 @direntry
24 * FAQ: (xemacs-faq).            XEmacs FAQ.
25 @end direntry
26 @end ifinfo
27
28 @node Top, Introduction, (dir), (dir)
29 @top XEmacs FAQ
30 @unnumbered Introduction
31
32 This is the guide to the XEmacs Frequently Asked Questions list---a
33 compendium of questions and answers pertaining to one of the finest
34 programs ever written.  It is much more than just a Text Editor.
35
36 This FAQ is freely redistributable.  I take no liability for the
37 correctness and safety of any procedures or advice given here.  This
38 FAQ is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY
39 WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or
40 FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
41
42 If you have a Web browser, the official hypertext version is at
43 @iftex
44 @*
45 @end iftex
46 @uref{http://www.xemacs.org/faq/xemacs-faq.html}.
47
48 This version is somewhat nicer than the unofficial hypertext versions
49 that are archived at Utrecht, Oxford, Smart Pages, and other FAQ
50 archives.
51
52 @ifset CANONICAL
53 @html
54 This document is available in several different formats:
55 @itemize @bullet
56 @item
57 @uref{xemacs-faq.txt, As a single ASCII file}, produced by
58 @code{makeinfo --no-headers}
59 @item
60 @uref{xemacs-faq.dvi, As a .dvi file}, as used with
61 @uref{http://www.tug.org, TeX.}
62 @item
63 As a PostScript file @uref{xemacs-faq-a4.ps, in A4 format},
64 as well as in @uref{xemacs-faq-letter.ps, letter format}
65 @item
66 In html format, @uref{xemacs-faq_1.html, split by chapter}, or in
67 @uref{xemacs-faq.html, one monolithic} document.
68 @item
69 The canonical version of the FAQ is the texinfo document
70 @uref{xemacs-faq.texi, man/xemacs-faq.texi}.
71 @item
72 If you do not have makeinfo installed, you may @uref{xemacs-faq.info,
73 download the faq} in info format, and install it in @file{<XEmacs
74 library directory>/info/}. For example in
75 @file{/usr/local/lib/xemacs-20.4/info/}.
76
77 @end itemize
78
79 @end html
80
81 @end ifset
82
83 @c end ifset points to CANONICAL
84
85 @menu
86 * Introduction::        Introduction, Policy, Credits.
87 * Installation::        Installation and Trouble Shooting.
88 * Customization::       Customization and Options.
89 * Subsystems::          Major Subsystems.
90 * Miscellaneous::       The Miscellaneous Stuff.
91 * Current Events::      What the Future Holds.
92
93 @detailmenu
94
95  --- The Detailed Node Listing ---
96
97 Introduction, Policy, Credits
98
99 * Q1.0.1::      What is XEmacs?
100 * Q1.0.2::      What is the current version of XEmacs?
101 * Q1.0.3::      Where can I find it?
102 * Q1.0.4::      Why Another Version of Emacs?
103 * Q1.0.5::      Why Haven't XEmacs and GNU Emacs Merged?
104 * Q1.0.6::      Where can I get help?
105 * Q1.0.7::      Where is the mailing list archived?
106 * Q1.0.8::      How do you pronounce XEmacs?
107 * Q1.0.9::      What does XEmacs look like?
108 * Q1.0.10::     Is there a port of XEmacs to Microsoft ('95 or NT)?
109 * Q1.0.11::     Is there a port of XEmacs to the Macintosh?
110 * Q1.0.12::     Is there a port of XEmacs to NextStep?
111 * Q1.0.13::     Is there a port of XEmacs to OS/2?
112 * Q1.0.14::     Where can I get a printed copy of the XEmacs users manual?
113
114 Policies:
115 * Q1.1.1::      What is the FAQ editorial policy?
116 * Q1.1.2::      How do I become a Beta Tester?
117 * Q1.1.3::      How do I contribute to XEmacs itself?
118
119 Credits:
120 * Q1.2.1::      Who wrote XEmacs?
121 * Q1.2.2::      Who contributed to this version of the FAQ?
122 * Q1.2.3::      Who contributed to the FAQ in the past?
123
124 Internationalization:
125 * Q1.3.1::      What is the status of XEmacs v20?
126 * Q1.3.2::      What is the status of Asian-language support, aka @var{mule}?
127 * Q1.3.3::      How do I type non-ASCII characters?
128 * Q1.3.4::      Can XEmacs messages come out in a different language?
129 * Q1.3.5::      Please explain the various input methods in MULE/XEmacs 20.0
130 * Q1.3.6::      How do I portably code for MULE/XEmacs 20.0?
131 * Q1.3.7::      How about Cyrillic Modes?
132
133 Getting Started:
134 * Q1.4.1::      What is a @file{.emacs} and is there a sample one?
135 * Q1.4.2::      Can I use the same @file{.emacs} with the other Emacs?
136 * Q1.4.3::      Any good XEmacs tutorials around?
137 * Q1.4.4::      May I see an example of a useful XEmacs Lisp function?
138 * Q1.4.5::      And how do I bind it to a key?
139 * Q1.4.6::      What's the difference between a macro and a function?
140 * Q1.4.7::      Why options saved with 19.13 don't work with 19.14 or later?
141
142 Installation and Trouble Shooting
143
144 * Q2.0.1::      Running XEmacs without installing.
145 * Q2.0.2::      XEmacs is too big.
146 * Q2.0.3::      Compiling XEmacs with Netaudio.
147 * Q2.0.4::      Problems with Linux and ncurses.
148 * Q2.0.5::      Do I need X11 to run XEmacs?
149 * Q2.0.6::      I'm having strange crashes.  What do I do?
150 * Q2.0.7::      Libraries in non-standard locations.
151 * Q2.0.8::      can't resolve symbol _h_errno
152 * Q2.0.9::      Where do I find external libraries?
153 * Q2.0.10::     After I run configure I find a coredump, is something wrong?
154 * Q2.0.11::     XEmacs can't resolve host names.
155 * Q2.0.12::     Why can't I strip XEmacs?
156 * Q2.0.13::     Can't link XEmacs on Solaris with Gcc.
157 * Q2.0.14::     Make on HP/UX 9 fails after linking temacs
158
159 Trouble Shooting:
160 * Q2.1.1::      XEmacs just crashed on me!
161 * Q2.1.2::      Cryptic Minibuffer messages.
162 * Q2.1.3::      Translation Table Syntax messages at Startup.
163 * Q2.1.4::      Startup warnings about deducing proper fonts?
164 * Q2.1.5::      XEmacs cannot connect to my X Terminal.
165 * Q2.1.6::      XEmacs just locked up my Linux X server.
166 * Q2.1.7::      HP Alt key as Meta.
167 * Q2.1.8::      got (wrong-type-argument color-instance-p nil)!
168 * Q2.1.9::      XEmacs causes my OpenWindows 3.0 server to crash.
169 * Q2.1.10::     Warnings from incorrect key modifiers.
170 * Q2.1.11::     Can't instantiate image error... in toolbar
171 * Q2.1.12::     Regular Expression Problems on DEC OSF1.
172 * Q2.1.13::     HP/UX 10.10 and @code{create_process} failure
173 * Q2.1.14::     @kbd{C-g} doesn't work for me.  Is it broken?
174 * Q2.1.15::     How to debug an XEmacs problem with a debugger.
175 * Q2.1.16::     XEmacs crashes in @code{strcat} on HP/UX 10.
176 * Q2.1.17::     @samp{Marker does not point anywhere}.
177 * Q2.1.18::     19.14 hangs on HP/UX 10.10.
178 * Q2.1.19::     XEmacs does not follow the local timezone.
179 * Q2.1.20::     @samp{Symbol's function definition is void: hkey-help-show.}
180 * Q2.1.21::     Every so often the XEmacs frame freezes.
181 * Q2.1.22::     XEmacs seems to take a really long time to do some things.
182 * Q2.1.23::     Movemail on Linux does not work for XEmacs 19.15 and later.
183
184 Customization and Options
185
186 * Q3.0.1::      What version of Emacs am I running?
187 * Q3.0.2::      How do I evaluate Elisp expressions?
188 * Q3.0.3::      @code{(setq tab-width 6)} behaves oddly.
189 * Q3.0.4::      How can I add directories to the @code{load-path}?
190 * Q3.0.5::      How to check if a lisp function is defined?
191 * Q3.0.6::      Can I force the output of @code{(face-list)} to a buffer?
192 * Q3.0.7::      Font selections don't get saved after @code{Save Options}.
193 * Q3.0.8::      How do I make a single minibuffer frame?
194 * Q3.0.9::      What is @code{Customize}?
195
196 X Window System & Resources:
197 * Q3.1.1::      Where is a list of X resources?
198 * Q3.1.2::      How can I detect a color display?
199 * Q3.1.3::      @code{(set-screen-width)} worked in 19.6, but not in 19.13?
200 * Q3.1.4::      Specifying @code{Emacs*EmacsScreen.geometry} in @file{.emacs} does not work in 19.15?
201 * Q3.1.5::      How can I get the icon to just say @samp{XEmacs}?
202 * Q3.1.6::      How can I have the window title area display the full path?
203 * Q3.1.7::      @samp{xemacs -name junk} doesn't work?
204 * Q3.1.8::      @samp{-iconic} doesn't work.
205
206 Textual Fonts & Colors:
207 * Q3.2.1::      How can I set color options from @file{.emacs}?
208 * Q3.2.2::      How do I set the text, menu and modeline fonts?
209 * Q3.2.3::      How can I set the colors when highlighting a region?
210 * Q3.2.4::      How can I limit color map usage?
211 * Q3.2.5::      My tty supports color, but XEmacs doesn't use them.
212 * Q3.2.6::      Can I have pixmap backgrounds in XEmacs?
213
214 The Modeline:
215 * Q3.3.1::      How can I make the modeline go away?
216 * Q3.3.2::      How do you have XEmacs display the line number in the modeline?
217 * Q3.3.3::      How do I get XEmacs to put the time of day on the modeline?
218 * Q3.3.4::      How do I turn off current chapter from AUC TeX modeline?
219 * Q3.3.5::      How can one change the modeline color based on the mode used?
220
221 Multiple Device Support:
222 * Q3.4.1::      How do I open a frame on another screen of my multi-headed display?
223 * Q3.4.2::      Can I really connect to a running XEmacs after calling up over a modem?  How?
224
225 The Keyboard:
226 * Q3.5.1::      How can I bind complex functions (or macros) to keys?
227 * Q3.5.2::      How can I stop down-arrow from adding empty lines to the bottom of my buffers?
228 * Q3.5.3::      How do I bind C-. and C-; to scroll one line up and down?
229 * Q3.5.4::      Globally binding @kbd{Delete}?
230 * Q3.5.5::      Scrolling one line at a time.
231 * Q3.5.6::      How to map @kbd{Help} key alone on Sun type4 keyboard?
232 * Q3.5.7::      How can you type in special characters in XEmacs?
233 * Q3.5.8::      Why does @code{(global-set-key [delete-forward] 'delete-char)} complain?
234 * Q3.5.9::      How do I make the Delete key delete forward?
235 * Q3.5.10::     Can I turn on @dfn{sticky} modifier keys?
236 * Q3.5.11::     How do I map the arrow keys?
237
238 The Cursor:
239 * Q3.6.1::      Is there a way to make the bar cursor thicker?
240 * Q3.6.2::      Is there a way to get back the old block cursor where the cursor covers the character in front of the point?
241 * Q3.6.3::      Can I make the cursor blink?
242
243 The Mouse and Highlighting:
244 * Q3.7.1::      How can I turn off Mouse pasting?
245 * Q3.7.2::      How do I set control/meta/etc modifiers on mouse buttons?
246 * Q3.7.3::      Clicking the left button does not do anything in buffer list.
247 * Q3.7.4::      How can I get a list of buffers when I hit mouse button 3?
248 * Q3.7.5::      Why does cut-and-paste not work between XEmacs and a cmdtool?
249 * Q3.7.6::      How I can set XEmacs up so that it pastes where the text cursor is?
250 * Q3.7.7::      How do I select a rectangular region?
251 * Q3.7.8::      Why does @kbd{M-w} take so long?
252
253 The Menubar and Toolbar:
254 * Q3.8.1::      How do I get rid of the menu (or menubar)?
255 * Q3.8.2::      Can I customize the basic menubar?
256 * Q3.8.3::      How do I control how many buffers are listed in the menu @code{Buffers} list?
257 * Q3.8.4::      Resources like @code{Emacs*menubar*font} are not working?
258 * Q3.8.5::      How can I bind a key to a function to toggle the toolbar?
259
260 Scrollbars:
261 * Q3.9.1::      How can I disable the scrollbar?
262 * Q3.9.2::      How can one use resources to change scrollbar colors?
263 * Q3.9.3::      Moving the scrollbar can move the point; can I disable this?
264 * Q3.9.4::      How can I get automatic horizontal scrolling?
265
266 Text Selections:
267 * Q3.10.1::     How can I turn off or change highlighted selections?
268 * Q3.10.2::     How do I get that typing on an active region removes it?
269 * Q3.10.3::     Can I turn off the highlight during isearch?
270 * Q3.10.4::     How do I turn off highlighting after @kbd{C-x C-p} (mark-page)?
271 * Q3.10.5::     The region disappears when I hit the end of buffer while scrolling.
272
273 Major Subsystems
274
275 * Q4.0.1::      How do I set up VM to retrieve remote mail using POP?
276 * Q4.0.2::      How do I get VM to filter mail for me?
277 * Q4.0.3::      How can I get VM to automatically check for new mail?
278 * Q4.0.4::      [This question intentionally left blank]
279 * Q4.0.5::      How do I get my outgoing mail archived?
280 * Q4.0.6::      I have various addresses at which I receive mail.  How can I tell VM to ignore them when doing a "reply-all"?
281 * Q4.0.7::      Is there a mailing list or FAQ for VM?
282 * Q4.0.8::      Remote mail reading with VM.
283 * Q4.0.9::      rmail or VM gets an error incorporating new mail.
284 * Q4.0.10::     How do I make VM stay in a single frame?
285 * Q4.0.11::     How do I make VM or mh-e display graphical smilies?
286 * Q4.0.12::     Customization of VM not covered in the manual or here.
287
288 Web browsing with W3:
289 * Q4.1.1::      What is W3?
290 * Q4.1.2::      How do I run W3 from behind a firewall?
291 * Q4.1.3::      Is it true that W3 supports style sheets and tables?
292
293 Reading Netnews and Mail with Gnus:
294 * Q4.2.1::      GNUS, (ding) Gnus, Gnus 5, September Gnus, Red Gnus, Quassia Gnus, argh!
295 * Q4.2.2::      [This question intentionally left blank]
296 * Q4.2.3::      How do I make Gnus stay within a single frame?
297 * Q4.2.4::      How do I customize the From: line?
298
299 Other Mail & News:
300 * Q4.3.1::      How can I read and/or compose MIME messages?
301 * Q4.3.2::      What is TM and where do I get it?
302 * Q4.3.3::      Why isn't this @code{movemail} program working?
303 * Q4.3.4::      Movemail is also distributed by Netscape?  Can that cause problems?
304 * Q4.3.5::      Where do I find pstogif (required by tm)?
305
306 Sparcworks, EOS, and WorkShop:
307 * Q4.4.1::      What is SPARCworks, EOS, and WorkShop
308
309 Energize:
310 * Q4.5.1::      What is/was Energize?
311
312 Infodock:
313 * Q4.6.1::      What is Infodock?
314
315 Other Unbundled Packages:
316 * Q4.7.1::      What is AUC TeX?  Where do you get it?
317 * Q4.7.2::      Are there any Emacs Lisp Spreadsheets?
318 * Q4.7.3::      Byte compiling AUC TeX on XEmacs 19.14
319 * Q4.7.4::      Problems installing AUC TeX
320 * Q4.7.5::      Is there a reason for an Emacs package not to be included in XEmacs?
321 * Q4.7.6::      Is there a MatLab mode?
322
323 The Miscellaneous Stuff
324
325 * Q5.0.1::      How can I do source code highlighting using font-lock?
326 * Q5.0.2::      I do not like cc-mode.  How do I use the old c-mode?
327 * Q5.0.3::      How do I get @samp{More} Syntax Highlighting on by default?
328 * Q5.0.4::      How can I enable auto-indent?
329 * Q5.0.5::      How can I get XEmacs to come up in text/auto-fill mode by default?
330 * Q5.0.6::      How do I start up a second shell buffer?
331 * Q5.0.7::      Telnet from shell filters too much.
332 * Q5.0.8::      Why does edt emulation not work?
333 * Q5.0.9::      How can I emulate VI and use it as my default mode?
334 * Q5.0.10::     [This question intentionally left blank]
335 * Q5.0.11::     Filladapt doesn't work in 19.15?
336 * Q5.0.12::     How do I disable gnuserv from opening a new frame?
337 * Q5.0.13::     How do I start gnuserv so that each subsequent XEmacs is a client?
338 * Q5.0.14::     Strange things are happening in Shell Mode.
339 * Q5.0.15::     Where do I get the latest CC Mode?
340 * Q5.0.16::     I find auto-show-mode disconcerting.  How do I turn it off?
341 * Q5.0.17::     How can I get two instances of info?
342 * Q5.0.18::     I upgraded to XEmacs 19.14 and gnuserv stopped working
343 * Q5.0.19::     Is there something better than LaTeX mode?
344 * Q5.0.20::     Is there a way to start a new XEmacs if there's no gnuserv running, and otherwise use gnuclient?
345
346 Emacs Lisp Programming Techniques:
347 * Q5.1.1::      The difference in key sequences between XEmacs and GNU Emacs?
348 * Q5.1.2::      Can I generate "fake" keyboard events?
349 * Q5.1.3::      Could you explain @code{read-kbd-macro} in more detail?
350 * Q5.1.4::      What is the performance hit of @code{let}?
351 * Q5.1.5::      What is the recommended use of @code{setq}?
352 * Q5.1.6::      What is the typical misuse of @code{setq} ?
353 * Q5.1.7::      I like the the @code{do} form of cl, does it slow things down?
354 * Q5.1.8::      I like recursion, does it slow things down?
355 * Q5.1.9::      How do I put a glyph as annotation in a buffer?
356 * Q5.1.10::     @code{map-extents} won't traverse all of my extents!
357 * Q5.1.11::     My elisp program is horribly slow.  Is there an easy way to find out where it spends time?
358
359 Sound:
360 * Q5.2.1::      How do I turn off the sound?
361 * Q5.2.2::      How do I get funky sounds instead of a boring beep?
362 * Q5.2.3::      What's NAS, how do I get it?
363 * Q5.2.4::      Sunsite sounds don't play.
364
365 Miscellaneous:
366 * Q5.3.1::      How do you make XEmacs indent CL if-clauses correctly?
367 * Q5.3.2::      Fontifying hangs when editing a postscript file.
368 * Q5.3.3::      How can I print WYSIWYG a font-locked buffer?
369 * Q5.3.4::      Getting @kbd{M-x lpr} to work with postscript printer.
370 * Q5.3.5::      How do I specify the paths that XEmacs uses for finding files?
371 * Q5.3.6::      [This question intentionally left blank]
372 * Q5.3.7::      Can I have the end of the buffer delimited in some way?
373 * Q5.3.8::      How do I insert today's date into a buffer?
374 * Q5.3.9::      Are only certain syntactic character classes available for abbrevs?
375 * Q5.3.10::     How can I get those oh-so-neat X-Face lines?
376 * Q5.3.11::     How do I add new Info directories?
377 * Q5.3.12::     What do I need to change to make printing work?
378
379 What the Future Holds
380
381 * Q6.0.1::      What is new in 20.2?
382 * Q6.0.2::      What is new in 20.3?
383 * Q6.0.3::      What is new in 20.4?
384 * Q6.0.4::      Procedural changes in XEmacs development.
385 @end detailmenu
386 @end menu
387
388 @node Introduction, Installation, Top, Top
389 @unnumbered 1 Introduction, Policy, Credits
390
391 Learning XEmacs is a lifelong activity.  Even people who have used Emacs
392 for years keep discovering new features.  Therefore this document cannot
393 be complete.  Instead it is aimed at the person who is either
394 considering XEmacs for their own use, or has just obtained it and is
395 wondering what to do next.  It is also useful as a reference to
396 available resources.
397
398 The previous maintainer of the FAQ was @email{rossini@@stat.sc.edu,
399 Anthony Rossini}, who started it, after getting tired of hearing JWZ
400 complain about repeatedly having to answer questions.
401 @email{ben@@666.com, Ben Wing} and @email{cthomp@@xemacs.org, Chuck
402 Thompson}, the principal authors of XEmacs, then took over and Ben did
403 a massive update reorganizing the whole thing.  At which point Anthony
404 took back over, but then had to give it up again.  Some of the other
405 contributors to this FAQ are listed later in this document.
406
407 The previous version was converted to hypertext format, and edited by
408 @email{steve@@altair.xemacs.org, Steven L. Baur}.  It was converted back to
409 texinfo by @email{hniksic@@srce.hr, Hrvoje Niksic}.
410
411 The FAQ was then maintained by @email{andreas@@sccon.com, Andreas
412 Kaempf}, who passed it on to @email{faq@@xemacs.org, Christian
413 Nyb@o{}}, the current FAQ maintainer.
414
415 If you notice any errors or items which should be added or amended to
416 this FAQ please send email to @email{faq@@xemacs.org, Christian
417 Nyb@o{}}. Include @samp{XEmacs FAQ} on the Subject: line.
418
419 @menu
420 Introduction:
421 * Q1.0.1::      What is XEmacs?
422 * Q1.0.2::      What is the current version of XEmacs?
423 * Q1.0.3::      Where can I find it?
424 * Q1.0.4::      Why Another Version of Emacs?
425 * Q1.0.5::      Why Haven't XEmacs and GNU Emacs Merged?
426 * Q1.0.6::      Where can I get help?
427 * Q1.0.7::      Where is the mailing list archived?
428 * Q1.0.8::      How do you pronounce XEmacs?
429 * Q1.0.9::      What does XEmacs look like?
430 * Q1.0.10::     Is there a port of XEmacs to Microsoft ('95 or NT)?
431 * Q1.0.11::     Is there a port of XEmacs to the Macintosh?
432 * Q1.0.12::     Is there a port of XEmacs to NextStep?
433 * Q1.0.13::     Is there a port of XEmacs to OS/2?
434 * Q1.0.14::     Where can I get a printed copy of the XEmacs users manual?
435
436 Policies:
437 * Q1.1.1::      What is the FAQ editorial policy?
438 * Q1.1.2::      How do I become a Beta Tester?
439 * Q1.1.3::      How do I contribute to XEmacs itself?
440
441 Credits:
442 * Q1.2.1::      Who wrote XEmacs?
443 * Q1.2.2::      Who contributed to this version of the FAQ?
444 * Q1.2.3::      Who contributed to the FAQ in the past?
445
446 Internationalization:
447 * Q1.3.1::      What is the status of XEmacs v20?
448 * Q1.3.2::      What is the status of Asian-language support, aka @var{mule}?
449 * Q1.3.3::      How do I type non-ASCII characters?
450 * Q1.3.4::      Can XEmacs messages come out in a different language?
451 * Q1.3.5::      Please explain the various input methods in MULE/XEmacs 20.0
452 * Q1.3.6::      How do I portably code for MULE/XEmacs 20.0?
453 * Q1.3.7::      How about Cyrillic Modes?
454
455 Getting Started:
456 * Q1.4.1::      What is a @file{.emacs} and is there a sample one?
457 * Q1.4.2::      Can I use the same @file{.emacs} with the other Emacs?
458 * Q1.4.3::      Any good XEmacs tutorials around?
459 * Q1.4.4::      May I see an example of a useful XEmacs Lisp function?
460 * Q1.4.5::      And how do I bind it to a key?
461 * Q1.4.6::      What's the difference between a macro and a function?
462 * Q1.4.7::      Why options saved with 19.13 don't work with 19.14 or later?
463 @end menu
464
465 @node Q1.0.1, Q1.0.2, Introduction, Introduction
466 @unnumberedsec 1.0: Introduction
467 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.0.1: What is XEmacs?
468
469
470 An alternative to GNU Emacs, originally based on an early alpha version
471 of FSF's version 19, and has diverged quite a bit since then.  XEmacs
472 was known as Lucid Emacs through version 19.10.  Almost all features of
473 GNU Emacs are supported in XEmacs.  The maintainers of XEmacs actively
474 track changes to GNU Emacs while also working to add new features.
475
476 @node Q1.0.2, Q1.0.3, Q1.0.1, Introduction
477 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.0.2: What is the current version of XEmacs?
478
479 XEmacs 20.4 is a minor upgrade from 20.3, containing many bugfixes. It
480 was released in February 1998.
481
482 XEmacs 19.16 was the last release of v19, released in November, 1997,
483 which was also the last version without international language support.
484
485 @node Q1.0.3, Q1.0.4, Q1.0.2, Introduction
486 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.0.3: Where can I find it?
487
488 The canonical source and binaries is found via anonymous FTP at:
489
490 @example
491 @uref{ftp://ftp.xemacs.org/pub/xemacs/}
492 @end example
493
494 @node Q1.0.4, Q1.0.5, Q1.0.3, Introduction
495 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.0.4: Why Another Version of Emacs?
496
497 For a detailed description of the differences between GNU Emacs and
498 XEmacs and a detailed history of XEmacs, check out the
499 @example
500 @uref{http://www.xemacs.org/NEWS.html, NEWS file}
501 @end example
502
503 However, here is a list of some of the reasons why we think you might
504 consider using it:
505
506 @itemize @bullet
507 @item
508 It looks nicer.
509
510 @item
511 The XEmacs maintainers are generally more receptive to suggestions than
512 the GNU Emacs maintainers.
513
514 @item
515 Many more bundled packages than GNU Emacs
516
517 @item
518 Binaries are available for many common operating systems.
519
520 @item
521 Face support on TTY's.
522
523 @item
524 A built-in toolbar.
525
526 @item
527 Better Motif compliance.
528
529 @item
530 Some internationalization support (including full MULE support, if
531 compiled with it.)
532
533 @item
534 Variable-width fonts.
535
536 @item
537 Variable-height lines.
538
539 @item
540 Marginal annotations.
541
542 @item
543 ToolTalk support.
544
545 @item
546 XEmacs can be used as an Xt widget, and can be embedded within another
547 application.
548
549 @item
550 Horizontal and vertical scrollbars (using real toolkit scrollbars).
551
552 @item
553 Better APIs (and performance) for attaching fonts, colors, and other
554 properties to text.
555
556 @item
557 The ability to embed arbitrary graphics in a buffer.
558
559 @item
560 Completely compatible (at the C level) with the Xt-based toolkits.
561
562 @item
563 First production Web Browser supporting Style Sheets.
564 @end itemize
565
566 @node Q1.0.5, Q1.0.6, Q1.0.4, Introduction
567 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.0.5: Why Haven't XEmacs and GNU Emacs Merged?
568
569 There are currently irreconcilable differences in the views about
570 technical, programming, design and organizational matters between RMS
571 and the XEmacs development team which provide little hope for a merge to
572 take place in the short-term future.
573
574 If you have a comment to add regarding the merge, it is a good idea to
575 avoid posting to the newsgroups,  because of the very heated flamewars
576 that often result.  Mail your questions to @email{xemacs-beta@@xemacs.org} and
577 @email{bug-gnu-emacs@@prep.ai.mit.edu}.
578
579 @node Q1.0.6, Q1.0.7, Q1.0.5, Introduction
580 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.0.6: Where can I get help?
581
582 Probably the easiest way, if everything is installed, is to use info, by
583 pressing @kbd{C-h i}, or selecting @code{Emacs Info} from the Help Menu.
584
585 Also, @kbd{M-x apropos} will look for commands for you.
586
587 Try reading this FAQ, examining the regular GNU Emacs FAQ (which can be
588 found with the Emacs 19 distribution) as well as at
589 @uref{http://www.eecs.nwu.edu/emacs/faq/} and reading the Usenet group
590 comp.emacs.xemacs.
591
592 If that does not help, try posting your question to comp.emacs.xemacs.
593 Please @strong{do not} post XEmacs related questions to gnu.emacs.help.
594
595 If you cannot post or read Usenet news, there is a corresponding mailing
596 list which is available.  It can be subscribed to by sending a message
597 with a subject of @samp{subscribe} to @email{xemacs-request@@xemacs.org}
598 for subscription information and @email{xemacs@@xemacs.org} to send messages
599 to the list.
600
601 To cancel a subscription, you @strong{must} use the xemacs-request
602 address.  Send a message with a subject of @samp{unsubscribe} to be
603 removed.
604
605 @node Q1.0.7, Q1.0.8, Q1.0.6, Introduction
606 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.0.7: Where is the mailing list archived?
607
608 The mailing list was archived in the directory
609 @example
610 @uref{ftp://ftp.xemacs.org/pub/mlists/}.
611 @end example
612
613 However, this archive is out of date.  The current mailing list server
614 supports an @code{archive} feature, which may be utilized.
615
616 @node Q1.0.8, Q1.0.9, Q1.0.7, Introduction
617 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.0.8: How do you pronounce XEmacs?
618
619 I pronounce it @samp{Eks eemax}.
620
621 @node Q1.0.9, Q1.0.10, Q1.0.8, Introduction
622 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.0.9: What does XEmacs look like?
623
624 Screen snapshots are available in the WWW version of the FAQ.
625 @example
626 @uref{http://www.xemacs.org/faq/xemacs-faq.html}
627 @end example
628
629 @node Q1.0.10, Q1.0.11, Q1.0.9, Introduction
630 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.0.10: Is there a port of XEmacs to Microsoft ('95 or NT)?
631
632 Thanks to efforts of many people, coordinated by
633 @email{davidh@@wr.com.au, David Hobley} and @email{marcpa@@cam.org, Marc
634 Paquette}, beta versions of XEmacs now run on 32-bit Windows platforms
635 (NT and 95).  The current betas require having an X server to run
636 XEmacs; however, a native NT/95 port is in alpha, thanks to
637 @email{jhar@@tardis.ed.ac.uk, Jonathan Harris}.
638
639 Although some features are still unimplemented, XEmacs 21.0 will support
640 MS-Windows.
641
642 The NT development is now coordinated by a mailing list at
643 @email{xemacs-nt@@xemacs.org}.
644
645 If you are willing to contribute or want to follow the progress, mail to
646 @iftex
647 @*
648 @end iftex
649 @email{xemacs-nt-request@@xemacs.org} to subscribe.
650
651 Furthermore, Altrasoft is seeking corporate and government sponsors to
652 help fund a fully native port of XEmacs to Windows 95 and NT using
653 full-time, senior-level staff working under a professionally managed
654 project structure.  See @uref{http://www.altrasoft.com/, the Altrasoft
655 web site} for more details
656 or contact Altrasoft directly at 1-888-ALTSOFT.
657
658
659 The closest existing port is @dfn{Win-Emacs}, which is based on Lucid
660 Emacs 19.6.  Available from @uref{http://www.pearlsoft.com/}.
661
662 There's a port of GNU Emacs (not XEmacs) at
663 @example
664 @uref{http://www.cs.washington.edu/homes/voelker/ntemacs.html}.
665 @end example
666
667 @node Q1.0.11, Q1.0.12, Q1.0.10, Introduction
668 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.0.11: Is there a port of XEmacs to the Macintosh?
669 @c changed
670
671 There has been a port to the MachTen environment of XEmacs 19.13, but no
672 patches have been submitted to the maintainers to get this in the
673 mainstream distribution.
674
675 For the MacOS, there is a port of
676 @uref{ftp://ftp.cs.cornell.edu/pub/parmet/, Emacs 18.59}.
677
678 @node Q1.0.12, Q1.0.13, Q1.0.11, Introduction
679 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.0.12: Is there a port of XEmacs to NextStep?
680
681 Carl Edman, apparently no longer at @email{cedman@@princeton.edu}, did
682 the port of GNU Emacs to NeXTstep and expressed interest in doing the
683 XEmacs port, but never went any farther.
684
685 @node Q1.0.13, Q1.0.14, Q1.0.12, Introduction
686 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.0.13: Is there a port of XEmacs to OS/2?
687
688 No, and there is no news of anyone working on it.
689
690 @node Q1.0.14, Q1.1.1, Q1.0.13, Introduction
691 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.0.14: Where can I obtain a printed copy of the XEmacs users manual?
692
693 Altrasoft Associates, a firm specializing in Emacs-related support and
694 development, will be maintaining the XEmacs user manual.  The firm plans
695 to begin publishing printed copies of the manual soon.
696 @c This used to say `March 1997'!
697
698 @example
699   Web:     @uref{http://www.xemacs.com}
700   E-mail:  @email{info@@xemacs.com}
701   Tel:     +1 408 243 3300
702 @end example
703
704 @node Q1.1.1, Q1.1.2, Q1.0.14, Introduction
705 @unnumberedsec 1.1: Policies
706 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.1.1: What is the FAQ editorial policy?
707
708 The FAQ is actively maintained and modified regularly.  All links should
709 be up to date.
710
711 Changes are displayed on a monthly basis.  @dfn{Months}, for this
712 purpose are defined as the 5th of the month through the 5th of the
713 month.  Preexisting questions that have been changed are marked as such.
714 Brand new questions are tagged.
715
716 All submissions are welcome.  E-mail submissions
717 to
718 @iftex
719 @*
720 @end iftex
721 @email{faq@@xemacs.org, Christian Nyb@o{}}.
722
723 Please make sure that @samp{XEmacs FAQ} appears on the Subject: line.
724 If you think you have a better way of answering a question, or think a
725 question should be included, I'd like to hear about it.  Questions and
726 answers included into the FAQ will be edited for spelling and grammar,
727 and will be attributed.  Answers appearing without attribution are
728 either from versions of the FAQ dated before May 1996, or are from one
729 of the four people listed at the top of this document.  Answers quoted
730 from Usenet news articles will always be attributed, regardless of the
731 author.
732
733 @node Q1.1.2, Q1.1.3, Q1.1.1, Introduction
734 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.1.2: How do I become a Beta Tester?
735
736 Send an email message to @email{xemacs-beta-request@@xemacs.org} with a
737 subject line of @samp{subscribe}.
738
739 Be prepared to get your hands dirty, as beta testers are expected to
740 identify problems as best they can.
741
742 @node Q1.1.3, Q1.2.1, Q1.1.2, Introduction
743 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.1.3: How do I contribute to XEmacs itself?
744
745 Ben Wing @email{ben@@666.com} writes:
746
747 @quotation
748 BTW if you have a wish list of things that you want added, you have to
749 speak up about it!  More specifically, you can do the following if you
750 want a feature added (in increasing order of usefulness):
751
752 @itemize @bullet
753 @item
754 Make a posting about a feature you want added.
755
756 @item
757 Become a beta tester and make more postings about those same features.
758
759 @item
760 Convince us that you're going to use the features in some cool and
761 useful way.
762
763 @item
764 Come up with a clear and well-thought-out API concerning the features.
765
766 @item
767 Write the code to implement a feature and send us a patch.
768 @end itemize
769
770 (not that we're necessarily requiring you to write the code, but we can
771 always hope :)
772 @end quotation
773
774 @node Q1.2.1, Q1.2.2, Q1.1.3, Introduction
775 @unnumberedsec 1.2: Credits
776 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.2.1: Who wrote XEmacs?
777
778 XEmacs is the result of the time and effort of many people.  The
779 developers responsible for the 19.16/20.x releases are:
780
781 @itemize @bullet
782 @item @email{martin@@xemacs.org, Martin Buchholz}
783 @ifhtml
784 <br><img src="mrb.jpeg" alt="Portrait of Martin Buchholz"><br>
785 @end ifhtml
786
787
788 @item @email{steve@@altair.xemacs.org, Steve Baur}
789
790 @ifhtml
791 <br><img src="steve.gif" alt="Portrait of Steve Baur"><br>
792 @end ifhtml
793
794
795 @item @email{hniksic@@srce.hr, Hrvoje Niksic}
796
797 @ifhtml
798 <br><img src="hniksic.jpeg" alt="Portrait of Hrvoje Niksic"><br>
799 @end ifhtml
800
801 @end itemize
802
803 The developers responsible for the 19.14 release are:
804
805 @itemize @bullet
806 @item @email{cthomp@@xemacs.org, Chuck Thompson}
807 @ifhtml
808 <br><img src="cthomp.jpeg" alt="Portrait of Chuck Thompson"><br>
809 @end ifhtml
810
811 Chuck was Mr. XEmacs from 19.11 through 19.14, and is responsible
812 for XEmacs becoming a widely distributed program over the Internet.
813
814 @item @email{ben@@666.com, Ben Wing}
815 @ifhtml
816 <br><img src="wing.gif" alt="Portrait of Ben Wing"><br>
817 @end ifhtml
818
819 @end itemize
820
821
822 @itemize @bullet
823 @item @email{jwz@@netscape.com, Jamie Zawinski}
824 @ifhtml
825 <br><img src="jwz.gif" alt="Portrait of Jamie Zawinski"><br>
826 @end ifhtml
827
828 Jamie Zawinski was Mr. Lucid Emacs from 19.0 through 19.10, the last
829 release actually named Lucid Emacs.  Richard Mlynarik was crucial to
830 most of those releases.
831
832 @item @email{mly@@adoc.xerox.com, Richard Mlynarik}
833 @end itemize
834
835 Along with many other contributors, partially enumerated in the
836 @samp{About XEmacs} option in the Help menu.
837
838 @node Q1.2.2, Q1.2.3, Q1.2.1, Introduction
839 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.2.2: Who contributed to this version of the FAQ?
840
841 The following people contributed valuable suggestions to building this
842 version of the FAQ (listed in alphabetical order):
843
844 @itemize @bullet
845 @item @email{steve@@xemacs.org, SL Baur}
846
847 @item @email{hniksic@@srce.hr, Hrvoje Niksic}
848
849 @item @email{Aki.Vehtari@@hut.fi, Aki Vehtari}
850
851 @end itemize
852
853 @node Q1.2.3, Q1.3.1, Q1.2.2, Introduction
854 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.2.3: Who contributed to the FAQ in the past?
855
856 This is only a partial list, as many names were lost in a hard disk
857 crash some time ago.
858
859 @itemize @bullet
860 @item @email{binge@@aloft.att.com, Curtis.N.Bingham}
861
862 @item @email{rjc@@cogsci.ed.ac.uk, Richard Caley}
863
864 @item @email{cognot@@ensg.u-nancy.fr, Richard Cognot}
865
866 @item @email{wgd@@martigny.ai.mit.edu, William G. Dubuque}
867
868 @item @email{eeide@@cs.utah.edu, Eric Eide}
869
870 @item @email{cflatter@@nrao.edu, Chris Flatters}
871
872 @item @email{ginsparg@@adra.com, Evelyn Ginsparg}
873
874 @item @email{hall@@aplcenmp.apl.jhu.edu, Marty Hall}
875
876 @item @email{dkindred@@cmu.edu, Darrell Kindred}
877
878 @item @email{dmoore@@ucsd.edu, David Moore}
879
880 @item @email{arup+@@cmu.edu, Arup Mukherjee}
881
882 @item @email{nickel@@prz.tu-berlin.de, Juergen Nickelsen}
883
884 @item @email{powell@@csl.ncsa.uiuc.edu, Kevin R. Powell}
885
886 @item @email{dworkin@@ccs.neu.edu, Justin Sheehy}
887
888 @item @email{stig@@hackvan.com, Stig}
889
890 @item @email{Aki.Vehtari@@hut.fi, Aki Vehtari}
891 @end itemize
892
893 @node Q1.3.1, Q1.3.2, Q1.2.3, Introduction
894 @unnumberedsec 1.3: Internationalization
895 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.3.1: What is the status of XEmacs v20?
896
897 XEmacs v20 is the version of XEmacs that includes MULE (Asian-language)
898 support.  XEmacs 20.0 was released in February 1997, followed by XEmacs
899 20.2 in May, XEmacs 20.3 in November and XEmacs 20.4 in February 1998.  When compiled without MULE
900 support, 20.4 is approximately as stable as 19.16, and probably faster
901 (due to additional optimization work.)
902
903 As of XEmacs 20.3, version 20 is @emph{the} supported version of
904 XEmacs.  This means that 19.16 will optionally receive stability fixes
905 (if any), but that all the real development work will be done on the v20
906 tree.
907
908 The incompatible changes in XEmacs 20 include the additional byte-codes,
909 new primitive data types (@code{character}, @code{char-table}, and
910 @code{range-table}).  This means that the character-integer equivalence
911 inherent to all the previous Emacs and XEmacs releases no longer
912 applies.
913
914 However, to avoid breaking old code, many functions that should normally
915 accept characters work with integers, and vice versa.  For more
916 information, see the Lisp reference manual.  Here is a relevant excerpt,
917 for your convenience.
918
919 @quotation
920   In XEmacs version 19, and in all versions of FSF GNU Emacs, a
921 @dfn{character} in XEmacs Lisp is nothing more than an integer.
922 This is yet another holdover from XEmacs Lisp's derivation from
923 vintage-1980 Lisps; modern versions of Lisp consider this equivalence
924 a bad idea, and have separate character types.  In XEmacs version 20,
925 the modern convention is followed, and characters are their own
926 primitive types. (This change was necessary in order for @sc{MULE},
927 i.e. Asian-language, support to be correctly implemented.)
928
929   Even in XEmacs version 20, remnants of the equivalence between
930 characters and integers still exist; this is termed the @dfn{char-int
931 confoundance disease}.  In particular, many functions such as @code{eq},
932 @code{equal}, and @code{memq} have equivalent functions (@code{old-eq},
933 @code{old-equal}, @code{old-memq}, etc.) that pretend like characters
934 are integers are the same.  Byte code compiled under any version 19
935 Emacs will have all such functions mapped to their @code{old-} equivalents
936 when the byte code is read into XEmacs 20.  This is to preserve
937 compatibility -- Emacs 19 converts all constant characters to the equivalent
938 integer during byte-compilation, and thus there is no other way to preserve
939 byte-code compatibility even if the code has specifically been written
940 with the distinction between characters and integers in mind.
941
942   Every character has an equivalent integer, called the @dfn{character
943 code}.  For example, the character @kbd{A} is represented as the
944 @w{integer 65}, following the standard @sc{ASCII} representation of
945 characters.  If XEmacs was not compiled with @sc{MULE} support, the
946 range of this integer will always be 0 to 255 -- eight bits, or one
947 byte. (Integers outside this range are accepted but silently truncated;
948 however, you should most decidedly @emph{not} rely on this, because it
949 will not work under XEmacs with @sc{MULE} support.)  When @sc{MULE}
950 support is present, the range of character codes is much
951 larger. (Currently, 19 bits are used.)
952
953   FSF GNU Emacs uses kludgy character codes above 255 to represent
954 keyboard input of @sc{ASCII} characters in combination with certain
955 modifiers.  XEmacs does not use this (a more general mechanism is
956 used that does not distinguish between @sc{ASCII} keys and other
957 keys), so you will never find character codes above 255 in a
958 non-@sc{MULE} XEmacs.
959
960   Individual characters are not often used in programs.  It is far more
961 common to work with @emph{strings}, which are sequences composed of
962 characters.
963 @end quotation
964
965 @node Q1.3.2, Q1.3.3, Q1.3.1, Introduction
966 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.3.2: What is the status of Asian-language support, aka MULE?
967
968 The MULE support works OK but still needs a fair amount of work before
969 it's really solid.  We could definitely use some help here, esp. people
970 who speak Japanese and will use XEmacs/MULE to work with Japanese and
971 have some experience with E-Lisp.
972
973 As the fundings on Mule have stopped, the Mule part of XEmacs is currently
974 looking for a full-time maintainer.  If you can provide help here, or
975 are willing to fund the work, please mail to @email{xemacs-beta@@xemacs.org}.
976
977 @xref{Q1.1.2}.
978
979 @node Q1.3.3, Q1.3.4, Q1.3.2, Introduction
980 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.3.3: How do I type non-ASCII characters?
981
982 See question 3.5.7 (@pxref{Q3.5.7}) in part 3 of this FAQ.
983
984 @node Q1.3.4, Q1.3.5, Q1.3.3, Introduction
985 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.3.4: Can XEmacs messages come out in a different language?
986
987 The message-catalog support has mostly been written but doesn't
988 currently work.  The first release of XEmacs 20 will @emph{not} support
989 it.  However, menubar localization @emph{does} work, even in 19.14.  To
990 enable it, add to your @file{Emacs} file entries like this:
991
992 @example
993 Emacs*XlwMenu.resourceLabels:                   True
994 Emacs*XlwMenu.file.labelString:                 Fichier
995 Emacs*XlwMenu.openInOtherWindow.labelString:    In anderem Fenster offnen
996 @end example
997
998 The name of the resource is derived from the non-localized entry by
999 removing punctuation and capitalizing as above.
1000
1001 @node Q1.3.5, Q1.3.6, Q1.3.4, Introduction
1002 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.3.5: Please explain the various input methods in MULE/XEmacs 20.0
1003
1004 @email{morioka@@jaist.ac.jp, MORIOKA Tomohiko} writes:
1005
1006 @quotation
1007 Original Mule supports the following input methods: Wnn4, Wnn6, Canna, SJ3
1008 and XIM. Interfaces for Wnn and SJ3 uses the @code{egg} user
1009 interface. Interface for Canna does not use @samp{egg}. I don't know
1010 about XIM. It is to support ATOK, of course, it may work for another
1011 servers.
1012
1013 Wnn supports Japanese, Chinese and Korean. It is made by OMRON and Kyôto
1014 university. It is a powerful and complex system.  Wnn4 is free and Wnn6
1015 is not free.
1016
1017 Canna supports only Japanese. It is made by NEC. It is a simple and
1018 powerful system. Canna uses only grammar (Wnn uses grammar and
1019 probability between words), so I think Wnn is cleverer than Canna,
1020 however Canna users made a good grammar and dictionary.  So for standard
1021 modern Japanese, Canna seems cleverer than Wnn4. In addition, the UNIX
1022 version of Canna is free (now there is a Microsoft Windows version).
1023
1024 SJ3 supports only Japanese. It is made by Sony.  XIM supports was made
1025 to use ATOK (a major input method in personal computer world).  XIM is
1026 the standard for accessing input methods bundled in Japanese versions of
1027 Solaris.  (XEmacs 20 will support XIM input).
1028
1029 Egg consists of following parts:
1030
1031 @enumerate
1032 @item
1033 Input character Translation System (ITS) layer.
1034 It translates ASCII inputs to Kana/PinYin/Hangul characters.
1035
1036 @item
1037 Kana/PinYin/Hangul to Kanji transfer layer.
1038 It is interface layer for network Kana-Kanji server (Wnn and Sj3).
1039 @end enumerate
1040
1041 These input methods are modal, namely there are mode, alphabet mode and
1042 Kana-Kanji transfer mode.  However there are mode-less input methods for
1043 Egg and Canna.  @samp{Boiled-egg} is a mode-less input method running on
1044 Egg.  For Canna, @samp{canna.el} has a tiny boiled-egg like command,
1045 @code{(canna-boil)}, and there are some boiled-egg like utilities.  In
1046 addition, it was planned to make an abstraction for all transfer type
1047 input methods.  However authors of input methods are busy, so maybe this
1048 plan is stopped.  Perhaps after Mule merged GNU Emacs will be released,
1049 it will be continued.
1050 @end quotation
1051
1052 @node Q1.3.6, Q1.3.7, Q1.3.5, Introduction
1053 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.3.6: How do I portably code for MULE/XEmacs 20?
1054
1055 @email{morioka@@jaist.ac.jp, MORIOKA Tomohiko} writes:
1056
1057 @quotation
1058 MULE and XEmacs are quite different. So the application
1059 implementor must write separate code for these mule variants.
1060
1061 MULE and the next version of Emacs are similar but the symbols are very
1062 different---requiring separate code as well.
1063
1064 Namely we must support 3 kinds of mule variants and 4 or 5 or 6 kinds of
1065 emacs variants... (;_;) I'm shocked, so I wrote a wrapper package called
1066 @code{emu} to provide a common interface.
1067
1068 I have the following suggestions about dealing with mule variants:
1069
1070 @itemize @bullet
1071 @item
1072 @code{(featurep 'mule)} @code{t} on all mule variants
1073
1074 @item
1075 @code{(boundp 'MULE)} is @code{t} on only MULE.  Maybe the next version
1076 of Emacs will not have this symbol.
1077
1078 @item
1079 MULE has a variable @code{mule-version}.  Perhaps the next version of
1080 Emacs will have this variable as well.
1081 @end itemize
1082
1083 Following is a sample to distinguish mule variants:
1084
1085 @lisp
1086 (if (featurep 'mule)
1087     (cond ((boundp 'MULE)
1088            ;; for original Mule
1089            )
1090           ((string-match "XEmacs" emacs-version)
1091            ;; for XEmacs with Mule
1092            )
1093           (t
1094            ;; for next version of Emacs
1095            ))
1096   ;; for old emacs variants
1097   )
1098 @end lisp
1099 @end quotation
1100
1101 @node Q1.3.7, Q1.4.1, Q1.3.6, Introduction
1102 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.3.7: How about Cyrillic Modes?
1103
1104 @email{ilya@@math.ohio-state.edu, Ilya Zakharevich} writes:
1105
1106 @quotation
1107 There is a cyrillic mode in the file @file{mysetup.zip} in
1108 @iftex
1109 @*
1110 @end iftex
1111 @uref{ftp://ftp.math.ohio-state.edu/pub/users/ilya/emacs/}.  This is a
1112 modification to @email{ava@@math.jhu.ed, Valery Alexeev's} @file{russian.el}
1113 which can be obtained from
1114 @end quotation
1115
1116 @uref{http://ftpsearch.ntnu.no/?query=russian.el.Z}.
1117 @c dead link above
1118
1119 @email{d.barsky@@ee.surrey.ac.uk, Dima Barsky} writes:
1120
1121 @quotation
1122 There is another cyrillic mode for both GNU Emacs and XEmacs by
1123 @email{manin@@camelot.mssm.edu, Dmitrii
1124 (Mitya) Manin} at
1125 @iftex
1126
1127 @end iftex
1128 @uref{http://kulichki-lat.rambler.ru/centrolit/manin/cyr.el}.
1129 @c Link above, <URL:http://camelot.mssm.edu/~manin/cyr.el> was dead.
1130 @c Changed to russian host instead
1131 @end quotation
1132
1133 @email{rebecca.ore@@op.net, Rebecca Ore} writes:
1134
1135 @quotation
1136 The fullest resource I found on Russian language use (in and out of
1137 XEmacs) is @uref{http://sunsite.oit.unc.edu/sergei/Software/Software.html}
1138 @end quotation
1139
1140 @node Q1.4.1, Q1.4.2, Q1.3.7, Introduction
1141 @unnumberedsec 1.4: Getting Started, Backing up & Recovery
1142 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.4.1: What is a @file{.emacs} and is there a sample one?
1143
1144 The @file{.emacs} file is used to customize XEmacs to your tastes.  No
1145 two are alike, nor are they expected to be alike, but that's the point.
1146 The XEmacs distribution contains an excellent starter example in the etc
1147 directory called @file{sample.emacs}.  Copy this file from there to your
1148 home directory and rename it @file{.emacs}.  Then edit it to suit.
1149
1150 Starting with 19.14, you may bring the @file{sample.emacs} into an
1151 XEmacs buffer by selecting @samp{Help->Sample .emacs} from the menubar.
1152 To determine the location of the @file{etc} directory type the command
1153 @kbd{C-h v data-directory @key{RET}}.
1154
1155 @node Q1.4.2, Q1.4.3, Q1.4.1, Introduction
1156 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.4.2: Can I use the same @file{.emacs} with the other Emacs?
1157
1158 Yes.  The sample @file{.emacs} included in the XEmacs distribution will
1159 show you how to handle different versions and flavors of Emacs.
1160
1161 @node Q1.4.3, Q1.4.4, Q1.4.2, Introduction
1162 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.4.3: Any good tutorials around?
1163
1164 There's the XEmacs tutorial available from the Help Menu, or by typing
1165 @kbd{C-h t}. To check whether it's available in a non-english language,
1166 type @kbd{C-u C-h t TAB}, type the first letters of your preferred
1167 language, then type @key{RET}.
1168
1169 There's an Emacs Lisp tutorial at
1170
1171 @example
1172 @uref{ftp://prep.ai.mit.edu/pub/gnu/emacs-lisp-intro-1.04.tar.gz}.
1173 @end example
1174
1175 @email{erik@@petaxp.rug.ac.be, Erik Sundermann} has made a tutorial web
1176 page at
1177 @iftex
1178 @*
1179 @end iftex
1180 @uref{http://petaxp.rug.ac.be/~erik/xemacs/}.
1181
1182 @node Q1.4.4, Q1.4.5, Q1.4.3, Introduction
1183 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.4.4: May I see an example of a useful XEmacs Lisp function?
1184
1185 The following function does a little bit of everything useful.  It does
1186 something with the prefix argument, it examines the text around the
1187 cursor, and it's interactive so it may be bound to a key.  It inserts
1188 copies of the current word the cursor is sitting on at the cursor.  If
1189 you give it a prefix argument: @kbd{C-u 3 M-x double-word} then it will
1190 insert 3 copies.
1191
1192 @lisp
1193 (defun double-word (count)
1194   "Insert a copy of the current word underneath the cursor"
1195   (interactive "*p")
1196   (let (here there string)
1197     (save-excursion
1198       (forward-word -1)
1199       (setq here (point))
1200       (forward-word 1)
1201       (setq there (point))
1202       (setq string (buffer-substring here there)))
1203     (while (>= count 1)
1204       (insert string)
1205       (decf count))))
1206 @end lisp
1207
1208 The best way to see what is going on here is to let XEmacs tell you.
1209 Put the code into an XEmacs buffer, and do a @kbd{C-h f} with the cursor
1210 sitting just to the right of the function you want explained.  Eg.  move
1211 the cursor to the SPACE between @code{interactive} and @samp{"*p"} and
1212 hit @kbd{C-h f} to see what the function @code{interactive} does.  Doing
1213 this will tell you that the @code{*} requires a writable buffer, and
1214 @code{p} converts the prefix argument to a number, and
1215 @code{interactive} allows you to execute the command with @kbd{M-x}.
1216
1217 @node Q1.4.5, Q1.4.6, Q1.4.4, Introduction
1218 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.4.5: And how do I bind it to a key?
1219
1220 To bind to a key do:
1221
1222 @lisp
1223 (global-set-key "\C-cd" 'double-word)
1224 @end lisp
1225
1226 Or interactively, @kbd{M-x global-set-key} and follow the prompts.
1227
1228 @node Q1.4.6, Q1.4.7, Q1.4.5, Introduction
1229 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.4.6: What's the difference between a macro and a function?
1230
1231 Quoting from the Lisp Reference (a.k.a @dfn{Lispref}) Manual:
1232
1233 @dfn{Macros} enable you to define new control constructs and other
1234 language features.  A macro is defined much like a function, but instead
1235 of telling how to compute a value, it tells how to compute another Lisp
1236 expression which will in turn compute the value.  We call this
1237 expression the @dfn{expansion} of the macro.
1238
1239 Macros can do this because they operate on the unevaluated expressions
1240 for the arguments, not on the argument values as functions do.  They can
1241 therefore construct an expansion containing these argument expressions
1242 or parts of them.
1243
1244 Do not confuse the two terms with @dfn{keyboard macros}, which are
1245 another matter, entirely.  A keyboard macro is a key bound to several
1246 other keys.  Refer to manual for details.
1247
1248 @node Q1.4.7, , Q1.4.6, Introduction
1249 @unnumberedsubsec Q1.4.7: How come options saved with 19.13 don't work with 19.14 or later?
1250
1251 There's a problem with options of the form:
1252
1253 @lisp
1254 (add-spec-list-to-specifier (face-property 'searchm-field 'font)
1255                             '((global (nil))))
1256 @end lisp
1257
1258 saved by a 19.13 XEmacs that causes a 19.14 XEmacs grief.  You must
1259 delete these options.  XEmacs 19.14 and later no longer write the
1260 options directly to @file{.emacs} which should allow us to deal with
1261 version incompatibilities better in the future.
1262
1263 Options saved under XEmacs 19.13 are protected by code that specifically
1264 requires a version 19 XEmacs.  This won't be a problem unless you're
1265 using XEmacs v20.  You should consider changing the code to read:
1266
1267 @lisp
1268 (cond
1269  ((and (string-match "XEmacs" emacs-version)
1270        (boundp 'emacs-major-version)
1271        (or (and (= emacs-major-version 19)
1272                 (>= emacs-minor-version 12))
1273            (>= emacs-major-version 20)))
1274   ...
1275   ))
1276 @end lisp
1277
1278 @node Installation, Customization, Introduction, Top
1279 @unnumbered 2 Installation and Trouble Shooting
1280
1281 This is part 2 of the XEmacs Frequently Asked Questions list.  This
1282 section is devoted to Installation, Maintenance and Trouble Shooting.
1283
1284 @menu
1285 Installation:
1286 * Q2.0.1::      Running XEmacs without installing.
1287 * Q2.0.2::      XEmacs is too big.
1288 * Q2.0.3::      Compiling XEmacs with Netaudio.
1289 * Q2.0.4::      Problems with Linux and ncurses.
1290 * Q2.0.5::      Do I need X11 to run XEmacs?
1291 * Q2.0.6::      I'm having strange crashes.  What do I do?
1292 * Q2.0.7::      Libraries in non-standard locations.
1293 * Q2.0.8::      can't resolve symbol _h_errno
1294 * Q2.0.9::      Where do I find external libraries?
1295 * Q2.0.10::     After I run configure I find a coredump, is something wrong?
1296 * Q2.0.11::     XEmacs can't resolve host names.
1297 * Q2.0.12::     Why can't I strip XEmacs?
1298 * Q2.0.13::     Can't link XEmacs on Solaris with Gcc.
1299 * Q2.0.14::     Make on HP/UX 9 fails after linking temacs
1300
1301 Trouble Shooting:
1302 * Q2.1.1::      XEmacs just crashed on me!
1303 * Q2.1.2::      Cryptic Minibuffer messages.
1304 * Q2.1.3::      Translation Table Syntax messages at Startup.
1305 * Q2.1.4::      Startup warnings about deducing proper fonts?
1306 * Q2.1.5::      XEmacs cannot connect to my X Terminal.
1307 * Q2.1.6::      XEmacs just locked up my Linux X server.
1308 * Q2.1.7::      HP Alt key as Meta.
1309 * Q2.1.8::      got (wrong-type-argument color-instance-p nil)!
1310 * Q2.1.9::      XEmacs causes my OpenWindows 3.0 server to crash.
1311 * Q2.1.10::     Warnings from incorrect key modifiers.
1312 * Q2.1.11::     Can't instantiate image error... in toolbar
1313 * Q2.1.12::     Regular Expression Problems on DEC OSF1.
1314 * Q2.1.13::     HP/UX 10.10 and @code{create_process} failure
1315 * Q2.1.14::     @kbd{C-g} doesn't work for me.  Is it broken?
1316 * Q2.1.15::     How to debug an XEmacs problem with a debugger.
1317 * Q2.1.16::     XEmacs crashes in @code{strcat} on HP/UX 10.
1318 * Q2.1.17::     @samp{Marker does not point anywhere}.
1319 * Q2.1.18::     19.14 hangs on HP/UX 10.10.
1320 * Q2.1.19::     XEmacs does not follow the local timezone.
1321 * Q2.1.20::     @samp{Symbol's function definition is void: hkey-help-show.}
1322 * Q2.1.21::     Every so often the XEmacs frame freezes.
1323 * Q2.1.22::     XEmacs seems to take a really long time to do some things.
1324 * Q2.1.23::     Movemail on Linux does not work for XEmacs 19.15 and later.
1325 @end menu
1326
1327 @node Q2.0.1, Q2.0.2, Installation, Installation
1328 @unnumberedsec 2.0: Installation
1329 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.0.1: Running XEmacs without installing
1330 The @file{INSTALL} file says that up to 108 MB of space is needed
1331 temporarily during installation!  How can I just try it out?
1332
1333 XEmacs will run in place without requiring installation and copying of
1334 the Lisp directories, and without having to specify a special build-time
1335 flag.  It's the copying of the Lisp directories that requires so much
1336 space.  XEmacs is largely written in Lisp.
1337
1338 A good method is to make a shell alias for xemacs:
1339
1340 @example
1341 alias xemacs=/i/xemacs-20.2/src/xemacs
1342 @end example
1343
1344 (You will obviously use whatever directory you downloaded the source
1345 tree to instead of @file{/i/xemacs-20.2}).
1346
1347 This will let you run XEmacs without massive copying.
1348
1349 @node Q2.0.2, Q2.0.3, Q2.0.1, Installation
1350 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.0.2: XEmacs is too big
1351
1352 Although this entry has been written for XEmacs 19.13, most of it still
1353 stands true.
1354
1355 @email{steve@@altair.xemacs.org, Steve Baur} writes:
1356
1357 @quotation
1358 The 45MB of space required by the installation directories can be
1359 reduced dramatically if desired.  Gzip all the .el files.  Remove all
1360 the packages you'll never want to use (or even ones you do like the two
1361 obsolete mailcrypts and Gnus 4 in 19.13).  Remove the TexInfo manuals.
1362 Remove the Info (and use just hardcopy versions of the manual).  Remove
1363 most of the stuff in etc.  Remove or gzip all the source code.  Gzip or
1364 remove the C source code.  Configure it so that copies are not made of
1365 the support lisp.  I'm not advocating any of these things, just pointing
1366 out ways to reduce the disk requirements if desired.
1367
1368 Now examine the space used by directory:
1369
1370 @format
1371 0       /usr/local/bin/xemacs
1372 2048    /usr/local/bin/xemacs-19.13
1373
1374 1546    /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/i486-miranova-sco3.2v4.2
1375 1158    /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/i486-unknown-linux1.2.13
1376 @end format
1377
1378 You need to keep these.  XEmacs isn't stripped by default in
1379 installation, you should consider stripping.  That will save you about
1380 5MB right there.
1381
1382 @format
1383 207     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/etc/w3
1384 122     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/etc/sounds
1385 18      /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/etc/sparcworks
1386 159     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/etc/vm
1387 6       /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/etc/e
1388 21      /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/etc/eos
1389 172     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/etc/toolbar
1390 61      /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/etc/ns
1391 43      /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/etc/gnus
1392 @end format
1393
1394 These are support directories for various packages.  In general they
1395 match a directory under ./xemacs-19.13/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/.  If you
1396 do not require the package, you may delete or gzip the support too.
1397
1398 @format
1399 1959    /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/etc
1400 175     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/bytecomp
1401 340     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/calendar
1402 342     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/comint
1403 517     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/dired
1404 42      /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/electric
1405 212     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/emulators
1406 238     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/energize
1407 289     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/gnus
1408 457     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/ilisp
1409 1439    /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/modes
1410 2276    /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/packages
1411 1040    /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/prim
1412 176     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/pcl-cvs
1413 154     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/rmail
1414 3       /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/epoch
1415 45      /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/term
1416 860     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/utils
1417 851     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/vm
1418 13      /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/vms
1419 157     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/x11
1420 19      /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/tooltalk
1421 14      /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/sunpro
1422 291     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/games
1423 198     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/edebug
1424 619     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/w3
1425 229     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/eos
1426 55      /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/iso
1427 59      /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/mailcrypt
1428 187     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/eterm
1429 356     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/ediff
1430 408     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/hyperbole/kotl
1431 1262    /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/hyperbole
1432 247     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/hm--html-menus
1433 161     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/mh-e
1434 299     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/viper
1435 53      /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/oobr/tree-x
1436 4       /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/oobr/tree-nx/English.lproj/DocWindow.nib
1437 3       /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/oobr/tree-nx/English.lproj/InfoPanel.nib
1438 3       /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/oobr/tree-nx/English.lproj/TreeView.nib
1439 11      /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/oobr/tree-nx/English.lproj
1440 53      /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/oobr/tree-nx
1441 466     /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp/oobr
1442 14142   /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp
1443 @end format
1444
1445 These are all Emacs Lisp source code and bytecompiled object code.  You
1446 may safely gzip everything named *.el here.  You may remove any package
1447 you don't use.  @emph{Nothing bad will happen if you delete a package
1448 that you do not use}.  You must be sure you do not use it though, so be
1449 conservative at first.
1450
1451 Possible candidates for deletion include w3 (newer versions exist, or
1452 you may just use Lynx or Netscape for web browsing), games, hyperbole,
1453 mh-e, hm--html-menus (better packages exist), vm, viper, oobr, gnus (new
1454 versions exist), etc.  Ask yourself, @emph{Do I ever want to use this
1455 package?}  If the answer is no, then it is a candidate for removal.
1456
1457 First, gzip all the .el files.  Then go about package by package and
1458 start gzipping the .elc files.  Then run XEmacs and do whatever it is
1459 you normally do.  If nothing bad happens, then delete the directory.  Be
1460 conservative about deleting directories, and it would be handy to have a
1461 backup tape around in case you get too zealous.
1462
1463 @file{prim}, @file{modes}, @file{packages}, and @file{utils} are four
1464 directories you definitely do @strong{not} want to delete, although
1465 certain packages can be removed from them if you do not use them.
1466
1467 @example
1468 1972    /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/info
1469 @end example
1470
1471 These are online texinfo sources.  You may either gzip them or remove
1472 them.  In either case, @kbd{C-h i} (info mode) will no longer work.
1473
1474 @example
1475 20778   /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13
1476 @end example
1477
1478 The 20MB achieved is less than half of what the full distribution takes up,
1479 @strong{and} can be achieved without deleting a single file.
1480 @end quotation
1481
1482 @email{boffi@@hp735.stru.polimi.it, Giacomo Boffi} provides this procedure:
1483
1484 @quotation
1485 Substitute @file{/usr/local/lib/} with the path where the xemacs tree is
1486 rooted, then use this script:
1487
1488 @example
1489 #!/bin/sh
1490
1491 r=/usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.13/lisp
1492
1493 cd $r ; rm -f cmpr ; touch cmpr
1494
1495 du -s .
1496
1497 for d in * ; do
1498   if test -d $d ; then
1499     cd $d
1500     for f in *.el ; do
1501 #     compress (remove) only (ONLY) the sources that have a
1502 #     corresponding compiled file --- do not (DO NOT)
1503 #     touch other sources
1504       if test -f $@{f@}c ; then gzip -v9 $f >> $r/cmpr ; fi
1505     done
1506     cd ..
1507   fi
1508 done
1509
1510 du -s .
1511 @end example
1512
1513 A step beyond would be substituting @samp{rm -f} for @samp{gzip -v9},
1514 but you have to be desperate for removing the sources (remember that
1515 emacs can access compressed files transparently).
1516
1517 Also, a good megabyte could easily be trimmed from the $r/../etc
1518 directory, e.g., the termcap files, some O+NEWS, others that I don't
1519 remember as well.
1520 @end quotation
1521
1522 @quotation
1523 XEmacs 21.0 will unbundle the lisp hierarchy and allow the installer
1524 to choose exactly how much support code gets installed.
1525 @end quotation
1526
1527 @node Q2.0.3, Q2.0.4, Q2.0.2, Installation
1528 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.0.3: Compiling XEmacs with Netaudio.
1529
1530 What is the best way to compile XEmacs with the netaudio system, since I
1531 have got the netaudio system compiled but installed at a weird place, I
1532 am not root.  Also in the READMEs it does not say anything about
1533 compiling with the audioserver?
1534
1535 You should only need to add some stuff to the configure command line.
1536 To tell it to compile in netaudio support: @samp{--with-sound=both}, or
1537 @samp{--with-sound=nas} if you don't want native sound support for some
1538 reason.) To tell it where to find the netaudio includes and libraries:
1539
1540 @example
1541 --site-libraries=WHATEVER
1542 --site-includes=WHATEVER
1543 @end example
1544
1545 Then (fingers crossed) it should compile and it will use netaudio if you
1546 have a server running corresponding to the X server. The netaudio server
1547 has to be there when XEmacs starts. If the netaudio server goes away and
1548 another is run, XEmacs should cope (fingers crossed, error handling in
1549 netaudio isn't perfect).
1550
1551 BTW, netaudio has been renamed as it has a name clash with something
1552 else, so if you see references to NAS or Network Audio System, it's the
1553 same thing.  It also might be found at
1554 @uref{ftp://ftp.x.org/contrib/audio/nas/}.
1555
1556 @node Q2.0.4, Q2.0.5, Q2.0.3, Installation
1557 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.0.4: Problems with Linux and ncurses.
1558
1559 On Linux 1.3.98 with termcap 2.0.8 and the ncurses that came with libc
1560 5.2.18, XEmacs 20.0b20 is unable to open a tty device:
1561
1562 @example
1563 src/xemacs -nw -q
1564 Initialization error:
1565 @iftex
1566 @*
1567 @end iftex
1568 Terminal type `xterm' undefined (or can't access database?)
1569 @end example
1570
1571 @email{ben@@666.com, Ben Wing} writes:
1572
1573 @quotation
1574 Your ncurses configuration is messed up.  Your /usr/lib/terminfo is a
1575 bad pointer, perhaps to a CD-ROM that is not inserted.
1576 @end quotation
1577
1578 @node Q2.0.5, Q2.0.6, Q2.0.4, Installation
1579 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.0.5: Do I need X11 to run XEmacs?
1580
1581 No.  The name @dfn{XEmacs} is unfortunate in the sense that it is
1582 @strong{not} an X Window System-only version of Emacs.  Starting with
1583 19.14 XEmacs has full color support on a color capable character
1584 terminal.
1585
1586 @node Q2.0.6, Q2.0.7, Q2.0.5, Installation
1587 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.0.6: I'm having strange crashes.  What do I do?
1588
1589 There have been a variety of reports of crashes due to compilers with
1590 buggy optimizers.  Please see the @file{PROBLEMS} file that comes with
1591 XEmacs to read what it says about your platform.
1592
1593 @node Q2.0.7, Q2.0.8, Q2.0.6, Installation
1594 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.0.7: Libraries in non-standard locations
1595
1596 I have x-faces, jpeg, xpm etc. all in different places.  I've tried
1597 space-separated, comma-separated, several --site-libraries, all to no
1598 avail.
1599
1600 @example
1601 --site-libraries='/path/one /path/two /path/etc'
1602 @end example
1603
1604 @node Q2.0.8, Q2.0.9, Q2.0.7, Installation
1605 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.0.8: can't resolve symbol _h_errno
1606
1607 You are using the Linux/ELF distribution of XEmacs 19.14, and your ELF
1608 libraries are out of date.  You have the following options:
1609
1610 @enumerate
1611 @item
1612 Upgrade your libc to at least 5.2.16 (better is 5.2.18, 5.3.12, or
1613 5.4.10).
1614
1615 @item
1616 Patch the XEmacs binary by replacing all occurrences of
1617 @samp{_h_errno^@@} with
1618 @iftex
1619 @*
1620 @end iftex
1621 @samp{h_errno^@@^@@}.  Any version of Emacs will
1622 suffice.  If you don't understand how to do this, don't do it.
1623
1624 @item
1625 Rebuild XEmacs yourself -- any working ELF version of libc should be
1626 O.K.
1627 @end enumerate
1628
1629 @email{hniksic@@srce.hr, Hrvoje Niksic} writes:
1630
1631 @quotation
1632 Why not use a Perl one-liner for No. 2?
1633
1634 @example
1635 perl -pi -e 's/_h_errno\0/h_errno\0\0/g' \
1636 /usr/local/bin/xemacs-19.14
1637 @end example
1638
1639 NB: You @emph{must} patch @file{/usr/local/bin/xemacs-19.14}, and not
1640 @file{xemacs} because @file{xemacs} is a link to @file{xemacs-19.14};
1641 the Perl @samp{-i} option will cause unwanted side-effects if applied to
1642 a symbolic link.
1643 @end quotation
1644
1645 @email{steve@@xemacs.org, SL Baur} writes:
1646
1647 @quotation
1648 If you build against a recent libc-5.4 (late enough to have caused
1649 problems earlier in the beta cycle) and then run with an earlier version
1650 of libc, you get a
1651
1652 @example
1653 $ xemacs
1654 xemacs: can't resolve symbol '__malloc_hook'
1655 zsh: 7942 segmentation fault (core dumped)  xemacs
1656 @end example
1657
1658 (Example binary compiled against libc-5.4.23 and run with libc-5.4.16).
1659
1660 The solution is to upgrade to at least libc-5.4.23.  Sigh.  Drat.
1661 @end quotation
1662
1663 @node Q2.0.9, Q2.0.10, Q2.0.8, Installation
1664 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.0.9: Where do I find external libraries?
1665
1666 All external libraries used by XEmacs can be found at the XEmacs FTP
1667 site
1668 @iftex
1669 @*
1670 @end iftex
1671 @uref{ftp://ftp.xemacs.org/pub/xemacs/aux/}.
1672
1673 @c Changed June Link above, <URL:ftp://ftp.xemacs.org/pub/aux/> was dead.
1674 @c This list is a pain in the you-know-what to keep in synch with the
1675 @c world.
1676 The canonical locations (at the time of this writing) are as follows:
1677
1678 @table @asis
1679 @item JPEG
1680 @uref{ftp://ftp.uu.net/graphics/jpeg/}.  Version 6a is current.
1681 @c Check from host with legal IP address
1682 @item XPM
1683 @uref{ftp://ftp.x.org/contrib/libraries/}.  Version 3.4j is current.
1684 Older versions of this package are known to cause XEmacs crashes.
1685
1686 @item TIFF
1687 @uref{ftp://ftp.sgi.com/graphics/tiff/}.  v3.4 is current.  The latest
1688 beta is v3.4b035.  There is a HOWTO here.
1689
1690 @item PNG
1691 @uref{ftp://ftp.uu.net/graphics/png/}.  0.89c is current.  XEmacs
1692 requires a fairly recent version to avoid using temporary files.
1693 @c Check from host with legal IP address
1694
1695 @uref{ftp://swrinde.nde.swri.edu/pub/png/src/}
1696
1697 @item Compface
1698 @uref{ftp://ftp.cs.indiana.edu/pub/faces/compface/}.  This library has
1699 been frozen for about 6 years, and is distributed without version
1700 numbers.  @emph{It should be compiled with the same options that X11 was
1701 compiled with on your system}.  The version of this library at
1702 XEmacs.org includes the @file{xbm2xface.pl} script, written by
1703 @email{stig@@hackvan.com}, which may be useful when generating your own xface.
1704
1705 @item NAS
1706 @uref{ftp://ftp.x.org/contrib/audio/nas/}.
1707 Version 1.2p5 is current.  There is a FAQ here.
1708 @end table
1709
1710 @node Q2.0.10, Q2.0.11, Q2.0.9, Installation
1711 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.0.10: After I run configure I find a core dump, is something wrong?
1712
1713 Not necessarily.  If you have GNU sed 3.0 you should downgrade it to
1714 2.05.  From the @file{README} at prep.ai.mit.edu:
1715
1716 @quotation
1717 sed 3.0 has been withdrawn from distribution.  It has major revisions,
1718 which mostly seem to be improvements; but it turns out to have bugs too
1719 which cause trouble in some common cases.
1720
1721 Tom Lord won't be able to work fixing the bugs until May.  So in the
1722 mean time, we've decided to withdraw sed 3.0 from distribution and make
1723 version 2.05 once again the recommended version.
1724 @end quotation
1725
1726 It has also been observed that the vfork test on Solaris will leave a
1727 core dump.
1728
1729 @node Q2.0.11, Q2.0.12, Q2.0.10, Installation
1730 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.0.11: XEmacs doesn't resolve hostnames.
1731
1732 This is the result of a long-standing problem with SunOS and the fact
1733 that stock SunOS systems do not ship with DNS resolver code in libc.
1734
1735 @email{ckd@@loiosh.kei.com, Christopher Davis} writes:
1736
1737 @quotation
1738 That's correct [The SunOS 4.1.3 precompiled binaries don't do name
1739 lookup].  Since Sun figured that everyone used NIS to do name lookups
1740 (that DNS thing was apparently only a passing fad, right?), the stock
1741 SunOS 4.x systems don't have DNS-based name lookups in libc.
1742
1743 This is also why Netscape ships two binaries for SunOS 4.1.x.
1744
1745 The best solution is to compile it yourself; the configure script will
1746 check to see if you've put DNS in the shared libc and will then proceed
1747 to link against the DNS resolver library code.
1748 @end quotation
1749
1750 @node Q2.0.12, Q2.0.13, Q2.0.11, Installation
1751 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.0.12: Why can't I strip XEmacs?
1752
1753 @email{cognot@@fronsac.ensg.u-nancy.fr, Richard Cognot} writes:
1754
1755 @quotation
1756 Because of the way XEmacs (and every other Emacsen, AFAIK) is built. The
1757 link gives you a bare-boned emacs (called temacs). temacs is then run,
1758 preloading some of the lisp files. The result is then dumped into a new
1759 executable, named xemacs, which will contain all of the preloaded lisp
1760 functions and data.
1761
1762 Now, during the dump itself, the executable (code+data+symbols) is
1763 written on disk using a special unexec() function. This function is
1764 obviously heavily system dependent. And on some systems, it leads to an
1765 executable which, although valid, cannot be stripped without damage. If
1766 memory serves, this is especially the case for AIX binaries. On other
1767 architecture it might work OK.
1768
1769 The Right Way to strip the emacs binary is to strip temacs prior to
1770 dumping xemacs. This will always work, although you can do that only if
1771 you install from sources (as temacs is @file{not} part of the binary
1772 kits).
1773 @end quotation
1774
1775 @email{nat@@nataa.fr.eu.org, Nat Makarevitch} writes:
1776
1777 @quotation
1778 Here is the trick:
1779
1780 @enumerate
1781 @item
1782 [ ./configure; make ]
1783
1784 @item
1785 rm src/xemacs
1786
1787 @item
1788 strip src/temacs
1789
1790 @item
1791 make
1792
1793 @item
1794 cp src/xemacs /usr/local/bin/xemacs
1795
1796 @item
1797 cp lib-src/DOC-19.16-XEmacs
1798 @iftex
1799 \ @*
1800 @end iftex
1801 /usr/local/lib/xemacs-19.16/i586-unknown-linuxaout
1802 @end enumerate
1803 @end quotation
1804
1805 @node Q2.0.13, Q2.0.14, Q2.0.12, Installation
1806 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.0.13: Problems linking with Gcc on Solaris
1807
1808 There are known difficulties linking with Gnu ld on Solaris.  A typical
1809 error message might look like:
1810
1811 @example
1812 unexec(): dlopen(../dynodump/dynodump.so): ld.so.1: ./temacs:
1813 fatal: relocation error:
1814 symbol not found: main: referenced in ../dynodump/dynodump.so
1815 @end example
1816
1817 @email{martin@@xemacs.org, Martin Buchholz} writes:
1818
1819 @quotation
1820 You need to specify @samp{-fno-gnu-linker} as part of your flags to pass
1821 to ld.  Future releases of XEmacs will try to do this automatically.
1822 @end quotation
1823
1824 @node Q2.0.14, Q2.1.1, Q2.0.13, Installation
1825 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.0.14: Make on HP/UX 9 fails after linking temacs
1826
1827 Problem when building xemacs-19.16 on hpux 9:
1828
1829 @email{cognot@@ensg.u-nancy.fr, Richard Cognot} writes:
1830
1831 @quotation
1832 make on hpux fails after linking temacs with a message:
1833
1834 @example
1835 "make: don't know how to make .y."
1836 @end example
1837
1838 Solution: This is a problem with HP make revision 70.X.  Either use GNU
1839 make, or install PHCO_6552, which will bring make to revision
1840 72.24.1.17.
1841 @end quotation
1842
1843
1844 @node Q2.1.1, Q2.1.2, Q2.0.14, Installation
1845 @unnumberedsec 2.1: Trouble Shooting
1846 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.1: Help!  XEmacs just crashed on me!
1847
1848 First of all, don't panic.  Whenever XEmacs crashes, it tries extremely
1849 hard to auto-save all of your files before dying.  (The main time that
1850 this will not happen is if the machine physically lost power or if you
1851 killed the XEmacs process using @code{kill -9}).  The next time you try
1852 to edit those files, you will be informed that a more recent auto-save
1853 file exists.  You can use @kbd{M-x recover-file} to retrieve the
1854 auto-saved version of the file.
1855
1856 Starting with 19.14, you may use the command @kbd{M-x recover-session}
1857 after a crash to pick up where you left off.
1858
1859 Now, XEmacs is not perfect, and there may occasionally be times, or
1860 particular sequences of actions, that cause it to crash.  If you can
1861 come up with a reproducible way of doing this (or even if you have a
1862 pretty good memory of exactly what you were doing at the time), the
1863 maintainers would be very interested in knowing about it.  Post a
1864 message to comp.emacs.xemacs or send mail to @email{crashes@@xemacs.org}.
1865 Please note that the @samp{crashes} address is exclusively for crash
1866 reports.
1867
1868 If at all possible, include a stack backtrace of the core dump that was
1869 produced.  This shows where exactly things went wrong, and makes it much
1870 easier to diagnose problems.  To do this, you need to locate the core
1871 file (it's called @file{core}, and is usually sitting in the directory
1872 that you started XEmacs from, or your home directory if that other
1873 directory was not writable).  Then, go to that directory and execute a
1874 command like:
1875
1876 @example
1877 gdb `which xemacs` core
1878 @end example
1879
1880 and then issue the command @samp{where} to get the stack backtrace.  You
1881 might have to use @code{dbx} or some similar debugger in place of
1882 @code{gdb}.  If you don't have any such debugger available, complain to
1883 your system administrator.
1884
1885 It's possible that a core file didn't get produced, in which case you're
1886 out of luck.  Go complain to your system administrator and tell him not
1887 to disable core files by default.  Also @xref{Q2.1.15}, for tips and
1888 techniques for dealing with a debugger.
1889
1890 When making a problem report make sure that:
1891
1892 @enumerate
1893 @item
1894 Report @strong{all} of the information output by XEmacs during the
1895 crash.
1896
1897 @item
1898 You mention what O/S & Hardware you are running XEmacs on.
1899
1900 @item
1901 What version of XEmacs you are running.
1902
1903 @item
1904 What build options you are using.
1905
1906 @item
1907 If the problem is related to graphics, we will also need to know what
1908 version of the X Window System you are running, and what window manager
1909 you are using.
1910
1911 @item
1912 If the problem happened on a tty, please include the terminal type.
1913 @end enumerate
1914
1915 @node Q2.1.2, Q2.1.3, Q2.1.1, Installation
1916 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.2: Cryptic Minibuffer messages.
1917
1918 When I try to use some particular option of some particular package, I
1919 get a cryptic error in the minibuffer.
1920
1921 If you can't figure out what's going on, select Options/General
1922 Options/Debug on Error from the Menubar and then try and make the error
1923 happen again.  This will give you a backtrace that may be enlightening.
1924 If not, try reading through this FAQ; if that fails, you could try
1925 posting to comp.emacs.xemacs (making sure to include the backtrace) and
1926 someone may be able to help.  If you can identify which Emacs lisp
1927 source file the error is coming from you can get a more detailed stack
1928 backtrace by doing the following:
1929
1930 @enumerate
1931 @item
1932 Visit the .el file in an XEmacs buffer.
1933
1934 @item
1935 Issue the command @kbd{M-x eval-current-buffer}.
1936
1937 @item
1938 Reproduce the error.
1939 @end enumerate
1940
1941 Depending on the version of XEmacs, you may either select Edit->Show
1942 Messages (19.13 and earlier) or Help->Recent Keystrokes/Messages (19.14
1943 and later) from the menubar to see the most recent messages.  This
1944 command is bound to @kbd{C-h l} by default.
1945
1946 @node Q2.1.3, Q2.1.4, Q2.1.2, Installation
1947 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.3: Translation Table Syntax messages at Startup
1948
1949 I get tons of translation table syntax error messages during startup.
1950 How do I get rid of them?
1951
1952 There are two causes of this problem.  The first usually only strikes
1953 people using the prebuilt binaries.  The culprit in both cases is the
1954 file @file{XKeysymDB}.
1955
1956 @itemize @bullet
1957 @item
1958 The binary cannot find the @file{XKeysymDB} file.  The location is
1959 hardcoded at compile time so if the system the binary was built on puts
1960 it a different place than your system does, you have problems.  To fix,
1961 set the environment variable @var{XKEYSYMDB} to the location of the
1962 @file{XKeysymDB} file on your system or to the location of the one
1963 included with XEmacs which should be at
1964 @iftex
1965 @*
1966 @end iftex
1967 @file{<xemacs_root_directory>/lib/xemacs-19.16/etc/XKeysymDB}.
1968
1969 @item
1970 The binary is finding the XKeysymDB but it is out-of-date on your system
1971 and does not contain the necessary lines.  Either ask your system
1972 administrator to replace it with the one which comes with XEmacs (which
1973 is the stock R6 version and is backwards compatible) or set your
1974 @var{XKEYSYMDB} variable to the location of XEmacs's described above.
1975 @end itemize
1976
1977 @node Q2.1.4, Q2.1.5, Q2.1.3, Installation
1978 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.4: Startup warnings about deducing proper fonts?
1979
1980 How can I avoid the startup warnings about deducing proper fonts?
1981
1982 This is highly dependent on your installation, but try with the
1983 following font as your base font for XEmacs and see what it does:
1984
1985 @format
1986 -adobe-courier-medium-r-*-*-*-120-*-*-*-*-iso8859-1
1987 @end format
1988
1989 More precisely, do the following in your resource file:
1990
1991 @format
1992 Emacs.default.attributeFont: \
1993 -adobe-courier-medium-r-*-*-*-120-*-*-*-*-iso8859-1
1994 @end format
1995
1996 If you just don't want to see the @samp{*Warnings*} buffer at startup
1997 time, you can set this:
1998
1999 @lisp
2000 (setq display-warning-minimum-level 'error)
2001 @end lisp
2002
2003 The buffer still exists; it just isn't in your face.
2004
2005 @node Q2.1.5, Q2.1.6, Q2.1.4, Installation
2006 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.5: XEmacs cannot connect to my X Terminal!
2007
2008 Help!  I can not get XEmacs to display on my Envizex X-terminal!
2009
2010 Try setting the @var{DISPLAY} variable using the numeric IP address of
2011 the host you are running XEmacs from.
2012
2013 @node Q2.1.6, Q2.1.7, Q2.1.5, Installation
2014 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.6: XEmacs just locked up my Linux X server!
2015
2016 There have been several reports of the X server locking up under Linux.
2017 In all reported cases removing speedo and scaled fonts from the font
2018 path corrected the problem.  This can be done with the command
2019 @code{xset}.
2020
2021 It is possible that using a font server may also solve the problem.
2022
2023 @node Q2.1.7, Q2.1.8, Q2.1.6, Installation
2024 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.7: HP Alt key as Meta.
2025
2026 How can I make XEmacs recognize the Alt key of my HP workstation as a
2027 Meta key?
2028
2029 Put the following line into a file and load it with xmodmap(1) before
2030 starting XEmacs:
2031
2032 @example
2033 remove Mod1 = Mode_switch
2034 @end example
2035
2036 @node Q2.1.8, Q2.1.9, Q2.1.7, Installation
2037 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.8: got (wrong-type-argument color-instance-p nil)
2038
2039 @email{nataliek@@rd.scitec.com.au, Natalie Kershaw} writes:
2040
2041 @quotation
2042 I am trying to run xemacs 19.13 under X11R4. Whenever I move the mouse I
2043 get the following error. Has anyone seen anything like this? This
2044 doesn't occur on X11R5.
2045
2046 @lisp
2047 Signalling:
2048 (error "got (wrong-type-argument color-instance-p nil)
2049 and I don't know why!")
2050 @end lisp
2051 @end quotation
2052
2053 @email{map01kd@@gold.ac.uk, dinos} writes:
2054
2055 @quotation
2056 I think this is due to undefined resources; You need to define color
2057 backgrounds and foregrounds into your @file{.../app-defaults/Emacs}
2058 like:
2059
2060 @example
2061 *Foreground:    Black   ;everything will be of black on grey95,
2062 *Background:    Grey95  ;unless otherwise specified.
2063 *cursorColor:   Red3    ;red3 cursor with grey95 border.
2064 *pointerColor:  Red3    ;red3 pointer with grey95 border.
2065 @end example
2066 @end quotation
2067
2068 Natalie Kershaw adds:
2069
2070 @quotation
2071 What fixed the problem was adding some more colors to the X color
2072 database (copying the X11R5 colors over), and also defining the
2073 following resources:
2074
2075 @example
2076 xemacs*cursorColor:    black
2077 xemacs*pointerColor:   black
2078 @end example
2079
2080 With the new colors installed the problem still occurs if the above
2081 resources are not defined.
2082
2083 If the new colors are not present then an additional error occurs on
2084 XEmacs startup, which says @samp{Color Red3} not defined.
2085 @end quotation
2086
2087 @node Q2.1.9, Q2.1.10, Q2.1.8, Installation
2088 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.9: XEmacs causes my OpenWindows 3.0 server to crash.
2089
2090 The OpenWindows 3.0 server is incredibly buggy.  Your best bet is to
2091 replace it with one from the generic MIT X11 release.  You might also
2092 try disabling parts of your @file{.emacs}, like enabling background
2093 pixmaps.
2094
2095 @node Q2.1.10, Q2.1.11, Q2.1.9, Installation
2096 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.10: Warnings from incorrect key modifiers.
2097
2098 The following information comes from the @file{PROBLEMS} file that comes
2099 with XEmacs.
2100
2101 If you're having troubles with HP/UX it is because HP/UX defines the
2102 modifiers wrong in X.  Here is a shell script to fix the problem; be
2103 sure that it is run after VUE configures the X server.
2104
2105 @example
2106 #! /bin/sh
2107 xmodmap 2> /dev/null - << EOF
2108 keysym Alt_L = Meta_L
2109 keysym Alt_R = Meta_R
2110 EOF
2111
2112 xmodmap - << EOF
2113 clear mod1
2114 keysym Mode_switch = NoSymbol
2115 add mod1 = Meta_L
2116 keysym Meta_R = Mode_switch
2117 add mod2 = Mode_switch
2118 EOF
2119 @end example
2120
2121 @node Q2.1.11, Q2.1.12, Q2.1.10, Installation
2122 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.11: @samp{Can't instantiate image error...} in toolbar
2123 @c New
2124
2125 @email{expt@@alanine.ram.org, Dr. Ram Samudrala} writes:
2126
2127 I just installed the XEmacs (20.4-2) RPMS that I downloaded from
2128 @uref{http://www.xemacs.org/}.  Everything works fine, except that when
2129 I place my mouse over the toolbar, it beeps and gives me this message:
2130
2131 @example
2132  Can't instantiate image (probably cached):
2133  [xbm :mask-file "/usr/include/X11/bitmaps/leftptrmsk :mask-data
2134  (16 16 <strange control characters> ...
2135 @end example
2136
2137 @email{kyle_jones@@wonderworks.com, Kyle Jones} writes:
2138 @quotation
2139 This is problem specific to some Chips and Technologies video
2140 chips, when running XFree86.  Putting
2141
2142 @code{Option "sw_cursor"}
2143
2144 in @file{XF86Config} gets rid of the problem.
2145 @end quotation
2146
2147 @node Q2.1.12, Q2.1.13, Q2.1.11, Installation
2148 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.12: Problems with Regular Expressions on DEC OSF1.
2149
2150 I have xemacs 19.13 running on an alpha running OSF1 V3.2 148 and ispell
2151 would not run because it claimed the version number was incorrect
2152 although it was indeed OK. I traced the problem to the regular
2153 expression handler.
2154
2155 @email{douglask@@dstc.edu.au, Douglas Kosovic} writes:
2156
2157 @quotation
2158 Actually it's a DEC cc optimization bug that screws up the regexp
2159 handling in XEmacs.
2160
2161 Rebuilding using the @samp{-migrate} switch for DEC cc (which uses a
2162 different sort of optimization) works fine.
2163 @end quotation
2164
2165 See @file{xemacs-19_13-dunix-3_2c.patch} at the following URL on how to
2166 build with the @samp{-migrate} flag:
2167
2168 @example
2169 @uref{http://www-digital.cern.ch/carney/emacs/emacs.html}
2170 @c Link above, <URL:http://www-digital.cern.ch/carney/emacs/emacs.html> is
2171 @c dead. And the directory `carney' is empty.
2172
2173
2174
2175 @end example
2176
2177 NOTE: There have been a variety of other problems reported that are
2178 fixed in this fashion.
2179
2180 @node Q2.1.13, Q2.1.14, Q2.1.12, Installation
2181 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.13: HP/UX 10.10 and @code{create_process} failure.
2182
2183 @email{Dave.Carrigan@@ipl.ca, Dave Carrigan} writes:
2184
2185 @quotation
2186 With XEmacs 19.13 and HP/UX 10.10, anything that relies on the
2187 @code{create_process} function fails. This breaks a lot of things
2188 (shell-mode, compile, ange-ftp, to name a few).
2189 @end quotation
2190
2191 @email{johnson@@dtc.hp.com, Phil Johnson} writes:
2192
2193 @quotation
2194 This is a problem specific to HP-UX 10.10.  It only occurs when XEmacs
2195 is compiled for shared libraries (the default), so you can work around
2196 it by compiling a statically-linked binary (run configure with
2197 @samp{--dynamic=no}).
2198
2199 I'm not sure whether the problem is with a particular shared library or
2200 if it's a kernel problem which crept into 10.10.
2201 @end quotation
2202
2203 @email{cognot@@ensg.u-nancy.fr, Richard Cognot} writes:
2204
2205 @quotation
2206 I had a few problems with 10.10. Apparently, some of them were solved by
2207 forcing a static link of libc (manually).
2208 @end quotation
2209
2210 @node Q2.1.14, Q2.1.15, Q2.1.13, Installation
2211 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.14: @kbd{C-g} doesn't work for me.  Is it broken?
2212
2213 @email{ben@@666.com, Ben Wing} writes:
2214
2215 @quotation
2216 @kbd{C-g} does work for most people in most circumstances.  If it
2217 doesn't, there are only two explanations:
2218
2219 @enumerate
2220 @item
2221 The code is wrapped with a binding of @code{inhibit-quit} to
2222 @code{t}.  @kbd{Ctrl-Shift-G} should still work, I think.
2223
2224 @item
2225 SIGIO is broken on your system, but BROKEN_SIGIO isn't defined.
2226 @end enumerate
2227
2228 To test #2, try executing @code{(while t)} from the @samp{*scratch*}
2229 buffer.  If @kbd{C-g} doesn't interrupt, then you're seeing #2.
2230 @end quotation
2231
2232 @email{terra@@diku.dk, Morten Welinder} writes:
2233
2234 @quotation
2235 On some (but @emph{not} all) machines a hung XEmacs can be revived by
2236 @code{kill -FPE <pid>}.  This is a hack, of course, not a solution.
2237 This technique works on a Sun4 running 4.1.3_U1.  To see if it works for
2238 you, start another XEmacs and test with that first.  If you get a core
2239 dump the method doesn't work and if you get @samp{Arithmetic error} then
2240 it does.
2241 @end quotation
2242
2243 @node Q2.1.15, Q2.1.16, Q2.1.14, Installation
2244 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.15: How to Debug an XEmacs problem with a debugger
2245
2246 If XEmacs does crash on you, one of the most productive things you can
2247 do to help get the bug fixed is to poke around a bit with the debugger.
2248 Here are some hints:
2249
2250 @itemize @bullet
2251 @item
2252 First of all, if the crash is at all reproducible, consider very
2253 strongly recompiling your XEmacs with debugging symbols, with no
2254 optimization, and with the configure options @samp{--debug=yes} and
2255 @samp{--error-checking=all}.  This will make your XEmacs run somewhat
2256 slower but make it a lot more likely to catch the problem earlier
2257 (closer to its source), and a lot easier to determine what's going on
2258 with a debugger.
2259
2260 @item
2261 If you're able to run XEmacs under a debugger and reproduce the crash
2262 (if it's inconvenient to do this because XEmacs is already running or is
2263 running in batch mode as part of a bunch of scripts, consider attaching
2264 to the existing process with your debugger; most debuggers let you do
2265 this by substituting the process ID for the core file when you invoke
2266 the debugger from the command line, or by using the @code{attach}
2267 command or something similar), here are some things you can do:
2268
2269 @item
2270 If XEmacs is hitting an assertion failure, put a breakpoint on
2271 @code{assert_failed()}.
2272
2273 @item
2274 If XEmacs is hitting some weird Lisp error that's causing it to crash
2275 (e.g. during startup), put a breakpoint on @code{signal_1()}---this is
2276 declared static in eval.c.
2277
2278 @item
2279 Internally, you will probably see lots of variables that hold objects of
2280 type @code{Lisp_Object}.  These are exactly what they appear to be,
2281 i.e. references to Lisp objects.  Printing them out with the debugger
2282 probably won't be too useful---you'll likely just see a number.  To
2283 decode them, do this:
2284
2285 @example
2286 call debug_print (OBJECT)
2287 @end example
2288
2289 where @var{OBJECT} is whatever you want to decode (it can be a variable,
2290 a function call, etc.).  This will print out a readable representation
2291 on the TTY from which the xemacs process was invoked.
2292
2293 @item
2294 If you want to get a Lisp backtrace showing the Lisp call
2295 stack, do this:
2296
2297 @example
2298 call debug_backtrace ()
2299 @end example
2300
2301 @item
2302 Using @code{debug_print} and @code{debug_backtrace} has two
2303 disadvantages - it can only be used with a running xemacs process, and
2304 it cannot display the internal C structure of a Lisp Object.  Even if
2305 all you've got is a core dump, all is not lost.
2306
2307 If you're using GDB, there are some macros in the file
2308 @file{src/gdbinit} in the XEmacs source distribution that should make it
2309 easier for you to decode Lisp objects.  Copy this file to
2310 @file{~/.gdbinit}, or @code{source} it from @file{~/.gdbinit}, and use
2311 the macros defined therein.  In particular, use the @code{pobj} macro to
2312 print the internal C representation of a lisp object.  This will work
2313 with a core file or not-yet-run executable.  The aliases @code{ldp} and
2314 @code{lbt} are provided for conveniently calling @code{debug_print} and
2315 @code{debug_backtrace}.
2316
2317 If you are using Sun's @file{dbx} debugger, there is an equivalent file
2318 @file{src/dbxrc} to copy to or source from @file{~/.dbxrc}.
2319
2320 @item
2321 If you're using a debugger to get a C stack backtrace and you're seeing
2322 stack traces with some of the innermost frames mangled, it may be due to
2323 dynamic linking. (This happens especially under Linux.) Consider
2324 reconfiguring with @samp{--dynamic=no}.  Also, sometimes (again under
2325 Linux), stack backtraces of core dumps will have the frame where the
2326 fatal signal occurred mangled; if you can obtain a stack trace while
2327 running the XEmacs process under a debugger, the stack trace should be
2328 clean.
2329
2330 @email{1CMC3466@@ibm.mtsac.edu, Curtiss} suggests upgrading to ld.so version 1.8
2331 if dynamic linking and debugging is a problem on Linux.
2332
2333 @item
2334 If you're using a debugger to get a C stack backtrace and you're
2335 getting a completely mangled and bogus stack trace, it's probably due to
2336 one of the following:
2337
2338 @enumerate a
2339 @item
2340 Your executable has been stripped.  Bad news.  Tell your sysadmin not to
2341 do this---it doesn't accomplish anything except to save a bit of disk
2342 space, and makes debugging much much harder.
2343
2344 @item
2345 Your stack is getting trashed.  Debugging this is hard; you have to do a
2346 binary-search type of narrowing down where the crash occurs, until you
2347 figure out exactly which line is causing the problem.  Of course, this
2348 only works if the bug is highly reproducible.
2349
2350 @item
2351 If your stack trace has exactly one frame in it, with address 0x0, this
2352 could simply mean that XEmacs attempted to execute code at that address,
2353 e.g. through jumping to a null function pointer.  Unfortunately, under
2354 those circumstances, GDB under Linux doesn't know how to get a stack
2355 trace. (Yes, this is the third Linux-related problem I've mentioned.  I
2356 have no idea why GDB under Linux is so bogus.  Complain to the GDB
2357 authors, or to comp.os.linux.development.system).  Again, you'll have to
2358 use the narrowing-down process described above.
2359
2360 @item
2361 If you compiled 19.14 with @samp{--debug} (or by default in later
2362 versions), you will get a Lisp backtrace output when XEmacs crashes, so
2363 you'll have something useful.
2364
2365 @end enumerate
2366
2367 @item
2368 If you compile with the newer gcc variants gcc-2.8 or egcs, you will
2369 also need gdb 4.17.  Earlier releases of gdb can't handle the debug
2370 information generated by the newer compilers.
2371
2372 @item
2373 The above information on using @file{src/gdbinit} works for XEmacs-21.0
2374 and above.  For older versions of XEmacs, there are different
2375 @file{gdbinit} files provided in the @file{src} directory.  Use the one
2376 corresponding to the configure options used when building XEmacs.
2377
2378 @end itemize
2379
2380 @node Q2.1.16, Q2.1.17, Q2.1.15, Installation
2381 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.16: XEmacs crashes in @code{strcat} on HP/UX 10
2382
2383 >From the problems database (through
2384 @uref{http://support.mayfield.hp.com/}):
2385
2386 @example
2387 Problem Report: 5003302299
2388 Status:         Open
2389
2390 System/Model:   9000/700
2391 Product Name:   HPUX S800 10.0X
2392 Product Vers:   9245XB.10.00
2393
2394 Description: strcat(3C) may read beyond
2395 end of source string, can cause SIGSEGV
2396
2397
2398 *** PROBLEM TEXT ***
2399 strcat(3C) may read beyond the source string onto an unmapped page,
2400 causing a segmentation violation.
2401 @end example
2402
2403 @node Q2.1.17, Q2.1.18, Q2.1.16, Installation
2404 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.17: @samp{Marker does not point anywhere}
2405
2406 As with other errors, set @code{debug-on-error} to @code{t} to get the
2407 backtrace when the error occurs.  Specifically, two problems have been
2408 reported (and fixed).
2409
2410 @enumerate
2411 @item
2412 A problem with line-number-mode in XEmacs 19.14 affected a large number
2413 of other packages.  If you see this error message, turn off
2414 line-number-mode.
2415
2416 @item
2417 A problem with some early versions of Gnus 5.4 caused this error.
2418 Upgrade your Gnus.
2419 @end enumerate
2420
2421 @node Q2.1.18, Q2.1.19, Q2.1.17, Installation
2422 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.18: 19.14 hangs on HP/UX 10.10.
2423
2424 @email{cognot@@ensg.u-nancy.fr, Richard Cognot} writes:
2425
2426 @quotation
2427 For the record, compiling on hpux 10.10 leads to a hang in Gnus when
2428 compiled with optimization on.
2429
2430 I've just discovered that my hpux 10.01 binary was working less well
2431 than expected. In fact, on a 10.10 system, @code{(while t)} was not
2432 interrupted by @kbd{C-g}. I defined @code{BROKEN_SIGIO} and recompiled on
2433 10.10, and... the hang is now gone.
2434
2435 As far as configure goes, this will be a bit tricky: @code{BROKEN_SIGIO}
2436 is needed on 10.10, but @strong{not} on 10.01: if I run my 10.01 binary
2437 on a 10.01 machine, without @code{BROKEN_SIGIO} being defined, @kbd{C-g}
2438 works as expected.
2439 @end quotation
2440
2441 @email{cognot@@ensg.u-nancy.fr, Richard Cognot} adds:
2442
2443 @quotation
2444 Apparently somebody has found the reason why there is this
2445 @iftex
2446 @*
2447 @end iftex
2448 @samp{poll:
2449 interrupted...} message for each event.  For some reason, libcurses
2450 reimplements a @code{select()} system call, in a highly broken fashion.
2451 The fix is to add a -lc to the link line @emph{before} the
2452 -lxcurses. XEmacs will then use the right version of @code{select()}.
2453 @end quotation
2454
2455
2456 @email{af@@biomath.jussieu.fr, Alain Fauconnet} writes:
2457
2458 @quotation
2459 The @emph{real} solution is to @emph{not} link -lcurses in!  I just
2460 changed -lcurses to -ltermcap in the Makefile and it fixed:
2461
2462 @enumerate
2463 @item
2464 The @samp{poll: interrupted system call} message.
2465
2466 @item
2467 A more serious problem I had discovered in the meantime, that is the
2468 fact that subprocess handling was seriously broken: subprocesses
2469 e.g. started by AUC TeX for TeX compilation of a buffer would
2470 @emph{hang}.  Actually they would wait forever for emacs to read the
2471 socket which connects stdout...
2472 @end enumerate
2473 @end quotation
2474
2475 @node Q2.1.19, Q2.1.20, Q2.1.18, Installation
2476 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.19: XEmacs does not follow the local timezone.
2477
2478 When using one of the prebuilt binaries many users have observed that
2479 XEmacs uses the timezone under which it was built, but not the timezone
2480 under which it is running.  The solution is to add:
2481
2482 @lisp
2483 (set-time-zone-rule "MET")
2484 @end lisp
2485
2486 to your @file{.emacs} or the @file{site-start.el} file if you can.
2487 Replace @code{MET} with your local timezone.
2488
2489 @node Q2.1.20, Q2.1.21, Q2.1.19, Installation
2490 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.20: @samp{Symbol's function definition is void: hkey-help-show.}
2491
2492 This is a problem with a partially loaded hyperbole.  Try adding:
2493
2494 @lisp
2495 (require 'hmouse-drv)
2496 @end lisp
2497
2498 where you load hyperbole and the problem should go away.
2499
2500 @node Q2.1.21, Q2.1.22, Q2.1.20, Installation
2501 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.21: Every so often the XEmacs frame freezes
2502
2503 This problem has been fixed in 19.15, and was due to a not easily
2504 reproducible race condition.
2505
2506 @node Q2.1.22, Q2.1.23, Q2.1.21, Installation
2507 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.22: XEmacs seems to take a really long time to do some things
2508
2509 @email{dmoore@@ucsd.edu, David Moore} writes:
2510
2511 @quotation
2512 Two things you can do:
2513
2514 1) C level:
2515
2516 When you see it going mad like this, you might want to use gdb from an
2517 'xterm' to attach to the running process and get a stack trace.  To do
2518 this just run:
2519
2520 @example
2521 gdb /path/to/xemacs/xemacs ####
2522 @end example
2523
2524 Where @code{####} is the process id of your xemacs, instead of
2525 specifying the core.  When gdb attaches, the xemacs will stop [1] and
2526 you can type `where' in gdb to get a stack trace as usual.  To get
2527 things moving again, you can just type `quit' in gdb.  It'll tell you
2528 the program is running and ask if you want to quit anyways.  Say 'y' and
2529 it'll quit and have your emacs continue from where it was at.
2530
2531 2) Lisp level:
2532
2533 Turn on debug-on-quit early on.  When you think things are going slow
2534 hit C-g and it may pop you in the debugger so you can see what routine
2535 is running.  Press `c' to get going again.
2536
2537 debug-on-quit doesn't work if something's turned on inhibit-quit or in
2538 some other strange cases.
2539 @end quotation
2540
2541 @node Q2.1.23,  , Q2.1.22, Installation
2542 @unnumberedsubsec Q2.1.23:  Movemail on Linux does not work for XEmacs 19.15 and later.
2543
2544 Movemail used to work fine in 19.14 but has stopped working in 19.15
2545 and 20.x.  I am using Linux.
2546
2547 @email{steve@@xemacs.org, SL Baur} writes:
2548
2549 @quotation
2550 Movemail on Linux used to default to using flock file locking.  With
2551 19.15 and later versions it now defaults to using @code{.lock} file
2552 locking.  If this is not appropriate for your system, edit src/s/linux.h
2553 and uncomment the line that reads:
2554
2555 @example
2556 #define MAIL_USE_FLOCK
2557 @end example
2558 @end quotation
2559
2560 @node Customization, Subsystems, Installation, Top
2561 @unnumbered 3 Customization and Options
2562
2563 This is part 3 of the XEmacs Frequently Asked Questions list.  This
2564 section is devoted to Customization and screen settings.
2565
2566 @menu
2567 Customization---Emacs Lisp and @file{.emacs}:
2568 * Q3.0.1::      What version of Emacs am I running?
2569 * Q3.0.2::      How do I evaluate Elisp expressions?
2570 * Q3.0.3::      @code{(setq tab-width 6)} behaves oddly.
2571 * Q3.0.4::      How can I add directories to the @code{load-path}?
2572 * Q3.0.5::      How to check if a lisp function is defined?
2573 * Q3.0.6::      Can I force the output of @code{(face-list)} to a buffer?
2574 * Q3.0.7::      Font selections don't get saved after @code{Save Options}.
2575 * Q3.0.8::      How do I make a single minibuffer frame?
2576 * Q3.0.9::      What is @code{Customize}?
2577
2578 X Window System & Resources:
2579 * Q3.1.1::      Where is a list of X resources?
2580 * Q3.1.2::      How can I detect a color display?
2581 * Q3.1.3::      @code{(set-screen-width)} worked in 19.6, but not in 19.13?
2582 * Q3.1.4::      Specifying @code{Emacs*EmacsScreen.geometry} in @file{.emacs} does not work in 19.15?
2583 * Q3.1.5::      How can I get the icon to just say @samp{XEmacs}?
2584 * Q3.1.6::      How can I have the window title area display the full path?
2585 * Q3.1.7::      @samp{xemacs -name junk} doesn't work?
2586 * Q3.1.8::      @samp{-iconic} doesn't work.
2587
2588 Textual Fonts & Colors:
2589 * Q3.2.1::      How can I set color options from @file{.emacs}?
2590 * Q3.2.2::      How do I set the text, menu and modeline fonts?
2591 * Q3.2.3::      How can I set the colors when highlighting a region?
2592 * Q3.2.4::      How can I limit color map usage?
2593 * Q3.2.5::      My tty supports color, but XEmacs doesn't use them.
2594 * Q3.2.6::      Can I have pixmap backgrounds in XEmacs?
2595
2596 The Modeline:
2597 * Q3.3.1::      How can I make the modeline go away?
2598 * Q3.3.2::      How do you have XEmacs display the line number in the modeline?
2599 * Q3.3.3::      How do I get XEmacs to put the time of day on the modeline?
2600 * Q3.3.4::      How do I turn off current chapter from AUC TeX modeline?
2601 * Q3.3.5::      How can one change the modeline color based on the mode used?
2602
2603 3.4 Multiple Device Support:
2604 * Q3.4.1::      How do I open a frame on another screen of my multi-headed display?
2605 * Q3.4.2::      Can I really connect to a running XEmacs after calling up over a modem?  How?
2606
2607 3.5 The Keyboard:
2608 * Q3.5.1::      How can I bind complex functions (or macros) to keys?
2609 * Q3.5.2::      How can I stop down-arrow from adding empty lines to the bottom of my buffers?
2610 * Q3.5.3::      How do I bind C-. and C-; to scroll one line up and down?
2611 * Q3.5.4::      Globally binding @kbd{Delete}?
2612 * Q3.5.5::      Scrolling one line at a time.
2613 * Q3.5.6::      How to map @kbd{Help} key alone on Sun type4 keyboard?
2614 * Q3.5.7::      How can you type in special characters in XEmacs?
2615 * Q3.5.8::      Why does @code{(global-set-key [delete-forward] 'delete-char)} complain?
2616 * Q3.5.9::      How do I make the Delete key delete forward?
2617 * Q3.5.10::     Can I turn on @dfn{sticky} modifier keys?
2618 * Q3.5.11::     How do I map the arrow keys?
2619
2620 The Cursor:
2621 * Q3.6.1::      Is there a way to make the bar cursor thicker?
2622 * Q3.6.2::      Is there a way to get back the old block cursor where the cursor covers the character in front of the point?
2623 * Q3.6.3::      Can I make the cursor blink?
2624
2625 The Mouse and Highlighting:
2626 * Q3.7.1::      How can I turn off Mouse pasting?
2627 * Q3.7.2::      How do I set control/meta/etc modifiers on mouse buttons?
2628 * Q3.7.3::      Clicking the left button does not do anything in buffer list.
2629 * Q3.7.4::      How can I get a list of buffers when I hit mouse button 3?
2630 * Q3.7.5::      Why does cut-and-paste not work between XEmacs and a cmdtool?
2631 * Q3.7.6::      How I can set XEmacs up so that it pastes where the text cursor is?
2632 * Q3.7.7::      How do I select a rectangular region?
2633 * Q3.7.8::      Why does @kbd{M-w} take so long?
2634
2635 The Menubar and Toolbar:
2636 * Q3.8.1::      How do I get rid of the menu (or menubar)?
2637 * Q3.8.2::      Can I customize the basic menubar?
2638 * Q3.8.3::      How do I control how many buffers are listed in the menu @code{Buffers} list?
2639 * Q3.8.4::      Resources like @code{Emacs*menubar*font} are not working?
2640 * Q3.8.5::      How can I bind a key to a function to toggle the toolbar?
2641
2642 Scrollbars:
2643 * Q3.9.1::      How can I disable the scrollbar?
2644 * Q3.9.2::      How can one use resources to change scrollbar colors?
2645 * Q3.9.3::      Moving the scrollbar can move the point; can I disable this?
2646 * Q3.9.4::      How can I get automatic horizontal scrolling?
2647
2648 Text Selections:
2649 * Q3.10.1::     How can I turn off or change highlighted selections?
2650 * Q3.10.2::     How do I get that typing on an active region removes it?
2651 * Q3.10.3::     Can I turn off the highlight during isearch?
2652 * Q3.10.4::     How do I turn off highlighting after @kbd{C-x C-p} (mark-page)?
2653 * Q3.10.5::     The region disappears when I hit the end of buffer while scrolling.
2654 @end menu
2655
2656 @node Q3.0.1, Q3.0.2, Customization, Customization
2657 @unnumberedsec 3.0: Customization -- Emacs Lisp and .emacs
2658 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.0.1: What version of Emacs am I running?
2659
2660 How can @file{.emacs} determine which of the family of Emacsen I am
2661 using?
2662
2663 To determine if you are currently running GNU Emacs 18, GNU Emacs 19,
2664 XEmacs 19, XEmacs 20, or Epoch, and use appropriate code, check out the
2665 example given in @file{etc/sample.emacs}.  There are other nifty things
2666 in there as well!
2667
2668 For all new code, all you really need to do is:
2669
2670 @lisp
2671 (defvar running-xemacs (string-match "XEmacs\\|Lucid" emacs-version))
2672 @end lisp
2673
2674 @node Q3.0.2, Q3.0.3, Q3.0.1, Customization
2675 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.0.2: How can I evaluate Emacs-Lisp expressions?
2676
2677 I know I can evaluate Elisp expressions from @code{*scratch*} buffer
2678 with @kbd{C-j} after the expression.  How do I do it from another
2679 buffer?
2680
2681 Press @kbd{M-:} (the default binding of @code{eval-expression}), and
2682 enter the expression to the minibuffer.  In XEmacs prior to 19.15
2683 @code{eval-expression} used to be a disabled command by default.  If
2684 this is the case, upgrade your XEmacs.
2685
2686 @node Q3.0.3, Q3.0.4, Q3.0.2, Customization
2687 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.0.3: @code{(setq tab-width 6)} behaves oddly.
2688
2689 If you put @code{(setq tab-width 6)} in your @file{.emacs} file it does
2690 not work!  Is there a reason for this?  If you do it at the EVAL prompt
2691 it works fine!! How strange.
2692
2693 Use @code{setq-default} instead, since @code{tab-width} is
2694 all-buffer-local.
2695
2696 @node Q3.0.4, Q3.0.5, Q3.0.3, Customization
2697 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.0.4: How can I add directories to the @code{load-path}?
2698
2699 Here are two ways to do that, one that puts your directories at the
2700 front of the load-path, the other at the end:
2701
2702 @lisp
2703 ;;; Add things at the beginning of the load-path, do not add
2704 ;;; duplicate directories:
2705 (pushnew "bar" load-path :test 'equal)
2706
2707 (pushnew "foo" load-path :test 'equal)
2708
2709 ;;; Add things at the end, unconditionally
2710 (setq load-path (nconc load-path '("foo" "bar")))
2711 @end lisp
2712
2713 @email{keithh@@nortel.ca, keith (k.p.) hanlan} writes:
2714
2715 @quotation
2716 To add directories using Unix shell metacharacters use
2717 @file{expand-file-name} like this:
2718
2719 @lisp
2720 (push (expand-file-name "~keithh/.emacsdir") load-path)
2721 @end lisp
2722 @end quotation
2723
2724 @node Q3.0.5, Q3.0.6, Q3.0.4, Customization
2725 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.0.5: How to check if a lisp function is defined?
2726
2727 Use the following elisp:
2728
2729 @lisp
2730 (fboundp 'foo)
2731 @end lisp
2732
2733 It's almost always a mistake to test @code{emacs-version} or any similar
2734 variables.
2735
2736 Instead, use feature-tests, such as @code{featurep}, @code{boundp},
2737 @code{fboundp}, or even simple behavioral tests, eg.:
2738
2739 @lisp
2740 (defvar foo-old-losing-code-p
2741   (condition-case nil (progn (losing-code t) nil)
2742     (wrong-number-of-arguments t)))
2743 @end lisp
2744
2745 There is an incredible amount of broken code out there which could work
2746 much better more often in more places if it did the above instead of
2747 trying to divine its environment from the value of one variable.
2748
2749 @node Q3.0.6, Q3.0.7, Q3.0.5, Customization
2750 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.0.6: Can I force the output of @code{(face-list)} to a buffer?
2751
2752 It would be good having it in a buffer, as the output of
2753 @code{(face-list)} is too wide to fit to a minibuffer.
2754
2755 Evaluate the expression in the @samp{*scratch*} buffer with point after
2756 the rightmost paren and typing @kbd{C-j}.
2757
2758 If the minibuffer smallness is the only problem you encounter, you can
2759 simply press @kbd{C-h l} to get the former minibuffer contents in a
2760 buffer.
2761
2762 @node Q3.0.7, Q3.0.8, Q3.0.6, Customization
2763 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.0.7: Font selections in don't get saved after @code{Save Options}.
2764
2765 For XEmacs 19.14 and previous:
2766
2767 @email{mannj@@ll.mit.edu, John Mann} writes:
2768
2769 @quotation
2770 You have to go to Options->Frame Appearance and unselect
2771 @samp{Frame-Local Font Menu}.  If this option is selected, font changes
2772 are only applied to the @emph{current} frame and do @emph{not} get saved
2773 when you save options.
2774 @end quotation
2775
2776 For XEmacs 19.15 and later:
2777
2778 Implement the above as well as set the following in your @file{.emacs}
2779
2780 @lisp
2781 (setq options-save-faces t)
2782 @end lisp
2783
2784 @node Q3.0.8, Q3.0.9, Q3.0.7, Customization
2785 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.0.8: How do I get a single minibuffer frame?
2786
2787 @email{acs@@acm.org, Vin Shelton} writes:
2788
2789 @lisp
2790 (setq initial-frame-plist '(minibuffer nil))
2791 (setq default-frame-plist '(minibuffer nil))
2792 (setq default-minibuffer-frame
2793       (make-frame
2794        '(minibuffer only
2795                     width 86
2796                     height 1
2797                     menubar-visible-p nil
2798                     default-toolbar-visible-p nil
2799                     name "minibuffer"
2800                     top -2
2801                     left -2
2802                     has-modeline-p nil)))
2803 (frame-notice-user-settings)
2804 @end lisp
2805
2806 @strong{Please note:} The single minibuffer frame may not be to everyone's
2807 taste, and there any number of other XEmacs options settings that may
2808 make it difficult or inconvenient to use.
2809
2810 @node Q3.0.9, Q3.1.1, Q3.0.8, Customization
2811 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.0.9: What is @code{Customize}?
2812
2813 Starting with XEmacs 20.2 there is new system 'Customize' for customizing
2814 XEmacs options.
2815
2816 You can access @code{Customize} from the @code{Options} menu
2817 or invoking one of customize commands by typing eg.
2818 @kbd{M-x customize}, @kbd{M-x customize-face},
2819 @kbd{M-x customize-variable} or @kbd{M-x customize-apropos}.
2820
2821 Starting with XEmacs 20.3 there is also new `browser' mode for Customize.
2822 Try it out with @kbd{M-x customize-browse}
2823
2824 @node Q3.1.1, Q3.1.2, Q3.0.9, Customization
2825 @unnumberedsec 3.1: X Window System & Resources
2826 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.1.1: Where is a list of X resources?
2827
2828 Search through the @file{NEWS} file for @samp{X Resources}.  A fairly
2829 comprehensive list is given after it.
2830
2831 In addition, an @file{app-defaults} file is supplied,
2832 @file{etc/Emacs.ad} listing the defaults.  The file
2833 @file{etc/sample.Xdefaults} gives a set of defaults that you might
2834 consider.  It is essentially the same as @file{etc/Emacs.ad} but some
2835 entries are slightly altered.  Be careful about installing the contents
2836 of this file into your @file{.Xdefaults} or @file{.Xresources} file if
2837 you use GNU Emacs under X11 as well.
2838
2839 @node Q3.1.2, Q3.1.3, Q3.1.1, Customization
2840 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.1.2: How can I detect a color display?
2841
2842 You can test the return value of the function @code{(device-class)}, as
2843 in:
2844
2845 @lisp
2846 (when (eq (device-class) 'color)
2847   (set-face-foreground  'font-lock-comment-face "Grey")
2848   (set-face-foreground  'font-lock-string-face  "Red")
2849   ....
2850   )
2851 @end lisp
2852
2853 @node Q3.1.3, Q3.1.4, Q3.1.2, Customization
2854 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.1.3: @code{(set-screen-width)} worked in 19.6, but not in 19.13?
2855
2856 In Lucid Emacs 19.6 I did @code{(set-screen-width @var{characters})} and
2857 @code{(set-screen-height @var{lines})} in my @file{.emacs} instead of
2858 specifying @code{Emacs*EmacsScreen.geometry} in my
2859 @iftex
2860 @*
2861 @end iftex
2862 @file{.Xdefaults} but
2863 this does not work in XEmacs 19.13.
2864
2865 These two functions now take frame arguments:
2866
2867 @lisp
2868 (set-frame-width (selected-frame) @var{characters})
2869 (set-frame-height (selected-frame) @var{lines})
2870 @end lisp
2871
2872 @node Q3.1.4, Q3.1.5, Q3.1.3, Customization
2873 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.1.4: Specifying @code{Emacs*EmacsScreen.geometry} in @file{.emacs} does not work in 19.15?
2874
2875 In XEmacs 19.11 I specified @code{Emacs*EmacsScreen.geometry} in
2876 my @file{.emacs} but this does not work in XEmacs 19.15.
2877
2878 We have switched from using the term @dfn{screen} to using the term
2879 @dfn{frame}.
2880
2881 The correct entry for your @file{.Xdefaults} is now:
2882
2883 @example
2884 Emacs*EmacsFrame.geometry
2885 @end example
2886
2887 @node Q3.1.5, Q3.1.6, Q3.1.4, Customization
2888 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.1.5: How can I get the icon to just say @samp{XEmacs}?
2889
2890 I'd like the icon to just say @samp{XEmacs}, and not include the name of
2891 the current file in it.
2892
2893 Add the following line to your @file{.emacs}:
2894
2895 @lisp
2896 (setq frame-icon-title-format "XEmacs")
2897 @end lisp
2898
2899 @node Q3.1.6, Q3.1.7, Q3.1.5, Customization
2900 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.1.6: How can I have the window title area display the full path?
2901
2902 I'd like to have the window title area display the full directory/name
2903 of the current buffer file and not just the name.
2904
2905 Add the following line to your @file{.emacs}:
2906
2907 @lisp
2908 (setq frame-title-format "%S: %f")
2909 @end lisp
2910
2911 A more sophisticated title might be:
2912
2913 @lisp
2914 (setq frame-title-format
2915       '("%S: " (buffer-file-name "%f"
2916                                  (dired-directory dired-directory "%b"))))
2917 @end lisp
2918
2919 That is, use the file name, or the dired-directory, or the buffer name.
2920
2921 @node Q3.1.7, Q3.1.8, Q3.1.6, Customization
2922 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.1.7: @samp{xemacs -name junk} doesn't work?
2923
2924 When I run @samp{xterm -name junk}, I get an xterm whose class name
2925 according to xprop, is @samp{junk}.  This is the way it's supposed to
2926 work, I think.  When I run @samp{xemacs -name junk} the class name is
2927 not set to @samp{junk}.  It's still @samp{emacs}.  What does
2928 @samp{xemacs -name} really do?  The reason I ask is that my window
2929 manager (fvwm) will make a window sticky and I use XEmacs to read my
2930 mail.  I want that XEmacs window to be sticky, without having to use the
2931 window manager's function to set the window sticky.  What gives?
2932
2933 @samp{xemacs -name} sets the application name for the program (that is,
2934 the thing which normally comes from @samp{argv[0]}).  Using @samp{-name}
2935 is the same as making a copy of the executable with that new name.  The
2936 @code{WM_CLASS} property on each frame is set to the frame-name, and the
2937 application-class.  So, if you did @samp{xemacs -name FOO} and then
2938 created a frame named @var{BAR}, you'd get an X window with WM_CLASS =
2939 @code{( "BAR", "Emacs")}.  However, the resource hierarchy for this
2940 widget would be:
2941
2942 @example
2943 Name:    FOO   .shell             .container   .BAR
2944 Class:   Emacs .TopLevelEmacsShell.EmacsManager.EmacsFrame
2945 @end example
2946
2947 instead of the default
2948
2949 @example
2950 Name:    xemacs.shell             .container   .emacs
2951 Class:   Emacs .TopLevelEmacsShell.EmacsManager.EmacsFrame
2952 @end example
2953
2954
2955 It is arguable that the first element of WM_CLASS should be set to the
2956 application-name instead of the frame-name, but I think that's less
2957 flexible, since it does not give you the ability to have multiple frames
2958 with different WM_CLASS properties.  Another possibility would be for
2959 the default frame name to come from the application name instead of
2960 simply being @samp{emacs}.  However, at this point, making that change
2961 would be troublesome: it would mean that many users would have to make
2962 yet another change to their resource files (since the default frame name
2963 would suddenly change from @samp{emacs} to @samp{xemacs}, or whatever
2964 the executable happened to be named), so we'd rather avoid it.
2965
2966 To make a frame with a particular name use:
2967
2968 @lisp
2969 (make-frame '((name . "the-name")))
2970 @end lisp
2971
2972 @node Q3.1.8, Q3.2.1, Q3.1.7, Customization
2973 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.1.8: @samp{-iconic} doesn't work.
2974
2975 When I start up XEmacs using @samp{-iconic} it doesn't work right.
2976 Using @samp{-unmapped} on the command line, and setting the
2977 @code{initiallyUnmapped} X Resource don't seem to help much either...
2978
2979 @email{ben@@666.com, Ben Wing} writes:
2980
2981 @quotation
2982 Ugh, this stuff is such an incredible mess that I've about given up
2983 getting it to work.  The principal problem is numerous window-manager
2984 bugs...
2985 @end quotation
2986
2987 @node Q3.2.1, Q3.2.2, Q3.1.8, Customization
2988 @unnumberedsec 3.2: Textual Fonts & Colors
2989 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.2.1: How can I set color options from @file{.emacs}?
2990
2991 How can I set the most commonly used color options from my @file{.emacs}
2992 instead of from my @file{.Xdefaults}?
2993
2994 Like this:
2995
2996 @lisp
2997 (set-face-background 'default      "bisque") ; frame background
2998 (set-face-foreground 'default      "black") ; normal text
2999 (set-face-background 'zmacs-region "red") ; When selecting w/
3000                                         ; mouse
3001 (set-face-foreground 'zmacs-region "yellow")
3002 (set-face-font       'default      "*courier-bold-r*120-100-100*")
3003 (set-face-background 'highlight    "blue") ; Ie when selecting
3004                                         ; buffers
3005 (set-face-foreground 'highlight    "yellow")
3006 (set-face-background 'modeline     "blue") ; Line at bottom
3007                                         ; of buffer
3008 (set-face-foreground 'modeline     "white")
3009 (set-face-font       'modeline     "*bold-r-normal*140-100-100*")
3010 (set-face-background 'isearch      "yellow") ; When highlighting
3011                                         ; while searching
3012 (set-face-foreground 'isearch      "red")
3013 (setq x-pointer-foreground-color   "black") ; Adds to bg color,
3014                                         ; so keep black
3015 (setq x-pointer-background-color   "blue") ; This is color
3016                                         ; you really
3017                                         ; want ptr/crsr
3018 @end lisp
3019
3020 @node Q3.2.2, Q3.2.3, Q3.2.1, Customization
3021 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.2.2: How do I set the text, menu and modeline fonts?
3022
3023 Note that you should use @samp{Emacs.} and not @samp{Emacs*} when
3024 setting face values.
3025
3026 In @file{.Xdefaults}:
3027
3028 @example
3029 Emacs.default.attributeFont:  -*-*-medium-r-*-*-*-120-*-*-m-*-*-*
3030 Emacs*menubar*font:           fixed
3031 Emacs.modeline.attributeFont: fixed
3032 @end example
3033
3034 This is confusing because modeline is a face, and can be found listed
3035 with all faces in the current mode by using @kbd{M-x set-face-font
3036 (enter) ?}.  It uses the face specification of @code{attributeFont},
3037 while menubar is a normal X thing that uses the specification
3038 @code{font}.  With Motif it may be necessary to use @code{fontList}
3039 instead of @code{font}.
3040
3041 @node Q3.2.3, Q3.2.4, Q3.2.2, Customization
3042 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.2.3: How can I set the colors when highlighting a region?
3043
3044 How can I set the background/foreground colors when highlighting a
3045 region?
3046
3047 You can change the face @code{zmacs-region} either in your
3048 @file{.Xdefaults}:
3049
3050 @example
3051 Emacs.zmacs-region.attributeForeground: firebrick
3052 Emacs.zmacs-region.attributeBackground: lightseagreen
3053 @end example
3054
3055 or in your @file{.emacs}:
3056
3057 @lisp
3058 (set-face-background 'zmacs-region "red")
3059 (set-face-foreground 'zmacs-region "yellow")
3060 @end lisp
3061
3062 @node Q3.2.4, Q3.2.5, Q3.2.3, Customization
3063 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.2.4: How can I limit color map usage?
3064
3065 I'm using Netscape (or another color grabber like XEmacs);
3066 is there anyway to limit the number of available colors in the color map?
3067
3068 XEmacs 19.13 didn't have such a mechanism (unlike netscape, or other
3069 color-hogs).  One solution is to start XEmacs prior to netscape, since
3070 this will prevent Netscape from grabbing all colors (but Netscape will
3071 complain).  You can use the flags for Netscape, like -mono, -ncols <#>
3072 or -install (for mono, limiting to <#> colors, or for using a private
3073 color map).  Since Netscape will take the entire colormap and never
3074 release it, the only reasonable way to run it is with @samp{-install}.
3075
3076 If you have the money, another solution would be to use a truecolor or
3077 direct color video.
3078
3079 Starting with XEmacs 19.14, XEmacs uses the closest available color if
3080 the colormap is full, so it's O.K. now to start Netscape first.
3081
3082 @node Q3.2.5, Q3.2.6, Q3.2.4, Customization
3083 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.2.5: My tty supports color, but XEmacs doesn't use them.
3084
3085 XEmacs tries to automatically determine whether your tty supports color,
3086 but sometimes guesses wrong.  In that case, you can make XEmacs Do The
3087 Right Thing using this Lisp code:
3088
3089 @lisp
3090 (if (eq 'tty (device-type))
3091     (set-device-class nil 'color))
3092 @end lisp
3093
3094 @node Q3.2.6, Q3.3.1, Q3.2.5, Customization
3095 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.2.6: Can I have pixmap backgrounds in XEmacs?
3096 @c New
3097 @email{jvillaci@@wahnsinnig.extreme.indiana.edu, Juan Villacis} writes:
3098
3099 @quotation
3100 There are several ways to do it.  For example, you could specify a
3101 default pixmap image to use in your @file{~/.Xresources}, e.g.,
3102
3103
3104 @example
3105   Emacs*EmacsFrame.default.attributeBackgroundPixmap: /path/to/image.xpm
3106 @end example
3107
3108
3109 and then reload ~/.Xresources and restart XEmacs.  Alternatively,
3110 since each face can have its own pixmap background, a better way
3111 would be to set a face's pixmap within your XEmacs init file, e.g.,
3112
3113 @lisp
3114   (set-face-background-pixmap 'default "/path/to/image.xpm")
3115   (set-face-background-pixmap 'bold    "/path/to/another_image.xpm")
3116 @end lisp
3117
3118 and so on.  You can also do this interactively via @kbd{M-x edit-faces}.
3119
3120 @end quotation
3121
3122 @unnumberedsec 3.3: The Modeline
3123 @node Q3.3.1, Q3.3.2, Q3.2.6, Customization
3124 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.3.1: How can I make the modeline go away?
3125
3126 @lisp
3127 (set-specifier has-modeline-p nil)
3128 @end lisp
3129
3130 Starting with XEmacs 19.14 the modeline responds to mouse clicks, so if
3131 you haven't liked or used the modeline in the past, you might want to
3132 try the new version out.
3133
3134 @node Q3.3.2, Q3.3.3, Q3.3.1, Customization
3135 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.3.2: How do you have XEmacs display the line number in the modeline?
3136
3137 Add the following line to your @file{.emacs} file to display the
3138 line number:
3139
3140 @lisp
3141 (line-number-mode 1)
3142 @end lisp
3143
3144 Use the following to display the column number:
3145
3146 @lisp
3147 (column-number-mode 1)
3148 @end lisp
3149
3150 Or select from the @code{Options} menu
3151 @iftex
3152 @*
3153 @end iftex
3154 @code{Customize->Emacs->Editing->Basics->Line Number Mode}
3155 and/or
3156 @iftex
3157 @*
3158 @end iftex
3159 @code{Customize->Emacs->Editing->Basics->Column Number Mode}
3160
3161 Or type @kbd{M-x customize @key{RET} editing-basics @key{RET}}.
3162
3163 @node Q3.3.3, Q3.3.4, Q3.3.2, Customization
3164 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.3.3: How do I get XEmacs to put the time of day on the modeline?
3165
3166 Add the following line to your @file{.emacs} file to display the
3167 time:
3168
3169 @lisp
3170 (display-time)
3171 @end lisp
3172
3173 See @code{Customize} from the @code{Options} menu for customization.
3174
3175 @node Q3.3.4, Q3.3.5, Q3.3.3, Customization
3176 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.3.4: How do I turn off current chapter from AUC TeX modeline?
3177
3178 With AUC TeX, fast typing is hard because the current chapter, section
3179 etc. are given in the modeline.  How can I turn this off?
3180
3181 It's not AUC TeX, it comes from @code{func-menu} in @file{func-menu.el}.
3182 Add this code to your @file{.emacs} to turn it off:
3183
3184 @lisp
3185 (setq fume-display-in-modeline-p nil)
3186 @end lisp
3187
3188 Or just add a hook to @code{TeX-mode-hook} to turn it off only for TeX
3189 mode:
3190
3191 @lisp
3192 (add-hook 'TeX-mode-hook
3193           '(lambda () (setq fume-display-in-modeline-p nil)))
3194 @end lisp
3195
3196 @email{dhughes@@origin-at.co.uk, David Hughes} writes:
3197
3198 @quotation
3199 If you have 19.14 or later, try this instead; you'll still get the
3200 function name displayed in the modeline, but it won't attempt to keep
3201 track when you modify the file. To refresh when it gets out of synch,
3202 you simply need click on the @samp{Rescan Buffer} option in the
3203 function-menu.
3204
3205 @lisp
3206 (setq-default fume-auto-rescan-buffer-p nil)
3207 @end lisp
3208 @end quotation
3209
3210 @node Q3.3.5, Q3.4.1, Q3.3.4, Customization
3211 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.3.5: How can one change the modeline color based on the mode used?
3212
3213 You can use something like the following:
3214
3215 @lisp
3216 (add-hook 'lisp-mode-hook
3217           (lambda ()
3218             (set-face-background 'modeline "red" (current-buffer))))
3219 @end lisp
3220
3221 Then, when editing a Lisp file (i.e. when in Lisp mode), the modeline
3222 colors change from the default set in your @file{.emacs}.  The change
3223 will only be made in the buffer you just entered (which contains the
3224 Lisp file you are editing) and will not affect the modeline colors
3225 anywhere else.
3226
3227 Notes:
3228
3229 @itemize @bullet
3230
3231 @item
3232 The hook is the mode name plus @code{-hook}.  eg. c-mode-hook,
3233 c++-mode-hook, emacs-lisp-mode-hook (used for your @file{.emacs} or a
3234 @file{xx.el} file), lisp-interaction-mode-hook (the @samp{*scratch*}
3235 buffer), text-mode-hook, etc.
3236
3237 @item
3238 Be sure to use @code{add-hook}, not @code{(setq c-mode-hook xxxx)},
3239 otherwise you will erase anything that anybody has already put on the
3240 hook.
3241
3242 @item
3243 You can also do @code{(set-face-font 'modeline @var{font})},
3244 eg. @code{(set-face-font 'modeline "*bold-r-normal*140-100-100*"
3245 (current-buffer))} if you wish the modeline font to vary based on the
3246 current mode.
3247 @end itemize
3248
3249 This works in 19.15 as well, but there are additional modeline faces,
3250 @code{modeline-buffer-id}, @code{modeline-mousable}, and
3251 @code{modeline-mousable-minor-mode}, which you may want to customize.
3252
3253 @node Q3.4.1, Q3.4.2, Q3.3.5, Customization
3254 @unnumberedsec 3.4: Multiple Device Support
3255 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.4.1: How do I open a frame on another screen of my multi-headed display?
3256
3257 The support for this was revamped for 19.14.  Use the command
3258 @kbd{M-x make-frame-on-display}.  This command is also on the File menu
3259 in the menubar.
3260
3261 XEmacs 19.14 and later also have the command @code{make-frame-on-tty}
3262 which will establish a connection to any tty-like device.  Opening the
3263 TTY devices should be left to @code{gnuclient}, though.
3264
3265 @node Q3.4.2, Q3.5.1, Q3.4.1, Customization
3266 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.4.2: Can I really connect to a running XEmacs after calling up over a modem?  How?
3267
3268 If you're not running at least XEmacs 19.14, you can't.  Otherwise check
3269 out the @code{gnuattach} program supplied with XEmacs.  Starting with
3270 XEmacs 20.3, @code{gnuattach} and @code{gnudoit} functionality is
3271 provided by @code{gnuclient}.
3272
3273 Also @xref{Q5.0.12}.
3274
3275 @node Q3.5.1, Q3.5.2, Q3.4.2, Customization
3276 @unnumberedsec 3.5: The Keyboard
3277 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.5.1: How can I bind complex functions (or macros) to keys?
3278
3279 As an example, say you want the @kbd{paste} key on a Sun keyboard to
3280 insert the current Primary X selection at point. You can accomplish this
3281 with:
3282
3283 @lisp
3284 (define-key global-map [f18] 'x-insert-selection)
3285 @end lisp
3286
3287 However, this only works if there is a current X selection (the
3288 selection will be highlighted).  The functionality I like is for the
3289 @kbd{paste} key to insert the current X selection if there is one,
3290 otherwise insert the contents of the clipboard.  To do this you need to
3291 pass arguments to @code{x-insert-selection}.  This is done by wrapping
3292 the call in a 'lambda form:
3293
3294 @lisp
3295 (global-set-key [f18]
3296   (lambda () (interactive) (x-insert-selection t nil)))
3297 @end lisp
3298
3299 This binds the f18 key to a @dfn{generic} functional object.  The
3300 interactive spec is required because only interactive functions can be
3301 bound to keys.
3302
3303 For the FAQ example you could use:
3304
3305 @lisp
3306 (global-set-key [(control ?.)]
3307   (lambda () (interactive) (scroll-up 1)))
3308 (global-set-key [(control ?             ;)]
3309                           (lambda () (interactive) (scroll-up -1)))
3310 @end lisp
3311
3312 This is fine if you only need a few functions within the lambda body.
3313 If you're doing more it's cleaner to define a separate function as in
3314 question 3.5.3 (@pxref{Q3.5.3}).
3315
3316 @node Q3.5.2, Q3.5.3, Q3.5.1, Customization
3317 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.5.2: How can I stop down-arrow from adding empty lines to the bottom of my buffers?
3318
3319 Add the following line to your @file{.emacs} file:
3320
3321 @lisp
3322 (setq next-line-add-newlines nil)
3323 @end lisp
3324
3325 This has been the default setting in XEmacs for some time.
3326
3327 @node Q3.5.3, Q3.5.4, Q3.5.2, Customization
3328 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.5.3: How do I bind C-. and C-; to scroll one line up and down?
3329
3330 Add the following (Thanks to @email{mly@@adoc.xerox.com, Richard Mlynarik} and
3331 @email{wayne@@zen.cac.stratus.com, Wayne Newberry}) to @file{.emacs}:
3332
3333 @lisp
3334 (defun scroll-up-one-line ()
3335   (interactive)
3336   (scroll-up 1))
3337
3338 (defun scroll-down-one-line ()
3339   (interactive)
3340   (scroll-down 1))
3341
3342 (global-set-key [(control ?.)] 'scroll-up-one-line) ; C-.
3343 (global-set-key [(control ?             ;)] 'scroll-down-one-line) ; C-;
3344 @end lisp
3345
3346 The key point is that you can only bind simple functions to keys; you
3347 can not bind a key to a function that you're also passing arguments to.
3348 (@pxref{Q3.5.1} for a better answer).
3349
3350 @node Q3.5.4, Q3.5.5, Q3.5.3, Customization
3351 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.5.4: Globally binding @kbd{Delete}?
3352
3353 I cannot manage to globally bind my @kbd{Delete} key to something other
3354 than the default.  How does one do this?
3355
3356 @lisp
3357 (defun foo ()
3358   (interactive)
3359   (message "You hit DELETE"))
3360
3361 (global-set-key 'delete 'foo)
3362 @end lisp
3363
3364 However, some modes explicitly bind @kbd{Delete}, so you would need to
3365 add a hook that does @code{local-set-key} for them.  If what you want to
3366 do is make the Backspace and Delete keys work more PC/Motif-like, then
3367 take a look at the @file{delbs.el} package.
3368
3369 New in XEmacs 19.14 is a variable called @code{key-translation-map}
3370 which makes it easier to bind @kbd{Delete}.  @file{delbs.el} is a
3371 good example of how to do this correctly.
3372
3373 Also @xref{Q3.5.10}.
3374
3375 @node Q3.5.5, Q3.5.6, Q3.5.4, Customization
3376 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.5.5: Scrolling one line at a time.
3377
3378 Can the cursor keys scroll the screen a line at a time, rather than the
3379 default half page jump?  I tend it to find it disorienting.
3380
3381 Try this:
3382
3383 @lisp
3384 (defun scroll-one-line-up (&optional arg)
3385   "Scroll the selected window up (forward in the text) one line (or N lines)."
3386   (interactive "p")
3387   (scroll-up (or arg 1)))
3388
3389 (defun scroll-one-line-down (&optional arg)
3390   "Scroll the selected window down (backward in the text) one line (or N)."
3391   (interactive "p")
3392   (scroll-down (or arg 1)))
3393
3394 (global-set-key [up]   'scroll-one-line-up)
3395 (global-set-key [down] 'scroll-one-line-down)
3396 @end lisp
3397
3398 The following will also work but will affect more than just the cursor
3399 keys (i.e. @kbd{C-n} and @kbd{C-p}):
3400
3401 @lisp
3402 (setq scroll-step 1)
3403 @end lisp
3404
3405 Starting with XEmacs-20.3 you can also change this with Customize.
3406 Select from the @code{Options} menu
3407 @code{Customize->Emacs->Environment->Windows->Scroll Step...} or type
3408 @kbd{M-x customize @key{RET} windows @key{RET}}.
3409
3410 @node Q3.5.6, Q3.5.7, Q3.5.5, Customization
3411 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.5.6: How to map @kbd{Help} key alone on Sun type4 keyboard?
3412
3413 The following works in GNU Emacs 19:
3414
3415 @lisp
3416 (global-set-key [help] 'help-command);; Help
3417 @end lisp
3418
3419 The following works in XEmacs 19.15 with the addition of shift:
3420
3421 @lisp
3422 (global-set-key [(shift help)] 'help-command);; Help
3423 @end lisp
3424
3425 But it doesn't work alone.  This is in the file @file{PROBLEMS} which
3426 should have come with your XEmacs installation: @emph{Emacs ignores the
3427 @kbd{help} key when running OLWM}.
3428
3429 OLWM grabs the @kbd{help} key, and retransmits it to the appropriate
3430 client using
3431 @iftex
3432 @*
3433 @end iftex
3434 @code{XSendEvent}.  Allowing Emacs to react to synthetic
3435 events is a security hole, so this is turned off by default.  You can
3436 enable it by setting the variable @code{x-allow-sendevents} to t.  You
3437 can also cause fix this by telling OLWM to not grab the help key, with
3438 the null binding @code{OpenWindows.KeyboardCommand.Help:}.
3439
3440 @node Q3.5.7, Q3.5.8, Q3.5.6, Customization
3441 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.5.7: How can you type in special characters in XEmacs?
3442 @c Changed
3443 One way is to use the package @code{x-compose}.  Then you can use
3444 sequences like @kbd{Compose " a} to get ä, etc.
3445
3446 Another way is to use the @code{iso-insert} package, provided in XEmacs
3447 19.15 and later. Then you can use sequences like @kbd{C-x 8 " a} to get
3448 ä, etc.
3449
3450 @email{glynn@@sensei.co.uk, Glynn Clements} writes:
3451
3452 @quotation
3453 It depends upon your X server.
3454
3455 Generally, the simplest way is to define a key as Multi_key with
3456 xmodmap, e.g.
3457 @c hey, show some respect, willya -- there's xkeycaps, isn't there? --
3458 @c chr ;)
3459 @example
3460         xmodmap -e 'keycode 0xff20 = Multi_key'
3461 @end example
3462
3463 You will need to pick an appropriate keycode. Use xev to find out the
3464 keycodes for each key.
3465
3466 [NB: On a `Windows' keyboard, recent versions of XFree86 automatically
3467 define the right `Windows' key as Multi_key'.]
3468
3469 Once you have Multi_key defined, you can use e.g.
3470 @example
3471         Multi a '       => á
3472         Multi e "       => ë
3473         Multi c ,       => ç
3474 @end example
3475
3476 etc.
3477
3478 Also, recent versions of XFree86 define various AltGr-<key>
3479 combinations as dead keys, i.e.
3480 @example
3481         AltGr [         => dead_diaeresis
3482         AltGr ]         => dead_tilde
3483         AltGr ;         => dead_acute
3484 @end example
3485 etc.
3486
3487 Running @samp{xmodmap -pk} will list all of the defined keysyms.
3488 @end quotation
3489
3490 @node Q3.5.8, Q3.5.9, Q3.5.7, Customization
3491 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.5.8: Why does @code{(global-set-key [delete-forward] 'delete-char)} complain?
3492
3493 Why does @code{(define-key global-map [ delete-forward ] 'delete-char)}
3494 complain of not being able to bind an unknown key?
3495
3496 Try this instead:
3497
3498 @lisp
3499 (define-key global-map [delete_forward] 'delete-char)
3500 @end lisp
3501
3502 and it will work.
3503
3504 What you are seeing above is a bug due to code that is trying to check
3505 for GNU Emacs syntax like:
3506
3507 (define-key global-map [C-M-a] 'delete-char)
3508
3509 which otherwise would cause no errors but would not result in the
3510 expected behavior.
3511
3512 This bug has been fixed in 19.14.
3513
3514 @node Q3.5.9, Q3.5.10, Q3.5.8, Customization
3515 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.5.9: How do I make the Delete key delete forward?
3516
3517 With XEmacs-20.2 use the @code{delbs} package:
3518
3519 @lisp
3520 (require 'delbs)
3521 @end lisp
3522
3523 This will give you the functions @code{delbs-enable-delete-forward} to
3524 set things up, and @code{delbs-disable-delete-forward} to revert to
3525 ``normal'' behavior.  Note that @code{delbackspace} package is obsolete.
3526
3527 Starting with XEmacs-20.3 better solution is to set variable
3528 @code{delete-key-deletes-forward} to t.  You can also change this with
3529 Customize. Select from the @code{Options} menu
3530 @code{Customize->Emacs->Editing->Basics->Delete Key Deletes Forward} or
3531 type @kbd{M-x customize @key{RET} editing-basics @key{RET}}.
3532
3533 Also @xref{Q3.5.4}.
3534
3535 @node Q3.5.10, Q3.5.11, Q3.5.9, Customization
3536 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.5.10: Can I turn on @dfn{sticky} modifier keys?
3537
3538 Yes, with @code{(setq modifier-keys-are-sticky t)}.  This will give the
3539 effect of being able to press and release Shift and have the next
3540 character typed come out in upper case.  This will affect all the other
3541 modifier keys like Control and Meta as well.
3542
3543 @email{ben@@666.com, Ben Wing} writes:
3544
3545 @quotation
3546 One thing about the sticky modifiers is that if you move the mouse out
3547 of the frame and back in, it cancels all currently ``stuck'' modifiers.
3548 @end quotation
3549
3550 @node Q3.5.11, Q3.6.1, Q3.5.10, Customization
3551 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.5.11: How do I map the arrow keys?
3552 @c New
3553 Say you want to map @kbd{C-@key{right}} to forward-word:
3554
3555 @email{sds@@usa.net, Sam Steingold} writes:
3556
3557 @quotation
3558 @lisp
3559 ; both XEmacs and Emacs
3560 (define-key global-map [(control right)] 'forward-word)
3561 @end lisp
3562 or
3563 @lisp
3564 ; Emacs only
3565 (define-key global-map [C-right] 'forward-word)
3566 @end lisp
3567 or
3568 @lisp
3569 ; ver > 20, both
3570 (define-key global-map (kbd "C-<right>") 'forward-word)
3571 @end lisp
3572 @end quotation
3573
3574
3575
3576 @node Q3.6.1, Q3.6.2, Q3.5.11, Customization
3577 @unnumberedsec 3.6: The Cursor
3578 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.6.1: Is there a way to make the bar cursor thicker?
3579
3580 I'd like to have the bar cursor a little thicker, as I tend to "lose" it
3581 often.
3582
3583 For a 1 pixel bar cursor, use:
3584
3585 @lisp
3586 (setq bar-cursor t)
3587 @end lisp
3588
3589 For a 2 pixel bar cursor, use:
3590
3591 @lisp
3592 (setq bar-cursor 'anything-else)
3593 @end lisp
3594
3595 Starting with XEmacs-20.3 you can also change these with Customize.
3596 Select from the @code{Options} menu
3597 @code{Customize->Emacs->Environment->Display->Bar Cursor...} or type
3598 @kbd{M-x customize @key{RET} display @key{RET}}.
3599
3600 You can use a color to make it stand out better:
3601
3602 @example
3603 Emacs*cursorColor:      Red
3604 @end example
3605
3606 @node Q3.6.2, Q3.6.3, Q3.6.1, Customization
3607 @unnumberedsubsec Q3.6.2: Is there a way to get back the block cursor?
3608
3609 @lisp
3610 (setq bar-cursor nil)
3611 @end lisp
3612
3613 Starting with XEmacs-20.3 you can also change this with Customize.
3614 Select from the @code{Options} menu
3615 @code{Customize->Emacs->Environment->Display->Bar Cursor...} or type
3616 @kbd{M-x customize @key{RET} display @key{RET}}.
3617